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To prevent eczema, promote breastfeeding? – Futurity – Futurity: Research News


Futurity: Research News
To prevent eczema, promote breastfeeding? – Futurity
Futurity: Research News
A program to promote exclusive breastfeeding reduced eczema rates among the babies later on, say researchers.
Breastfeeding can reduce risk of eczema later on | Well+GoodWell+Good

all 2 news articles »

eczema – Google News

To prevent eczema, promote breastfeeding? – Futurity: Research News


Futurity: Research News
To prevent eczema, promote breastfeeding?
Futurity: Research News
Babies whose mothers had received support to breastfeed exclusively for a sustained period from birth have a 54 percent lower risk of eczema at the age of 16, a new study shows. Eczema causes the skin to become itchy, dry, cracked, sore, and red. It
Breastfeeding can reduce risk of eczema later on | Well+GoodWell+Good

all 2 news articles »

eczema – Google News

7 DIY Home Remedies for Eczema

Another great post from itchylittleworld.com – Natural remedies for eczema to soothe your itchy little world..

By Laura Dolgy (bio below)

Does this sound like a familiar story? You’re at home, enjoying dinner when all of a sudden you start to notice an eczema flareup beginning on your neck. It’s Friday night and although you can wait until Monday to search for an eczema treatment, you need something you can find relatively quickly to stop the itch.

If you’ve ever been in this situation – you’ve come to the right place! This week, we’re sharing various DIY home remedies for eczema that are both natural and can be made with simple ingredients you can find at your local health or grocery store. No need to wait until Monday to get relief!

Please keep in mind I am in no way a medical professional. If you’re experiencing severe eczema or have a topical infection, it is always best to seek medical advice immediately.

1) Extra Virgin Coconut Oil

If you have mild eczema, applying a light layer of virgin coconut oil twice a day can heal the affected skin. In severe cases, you may have to apply a thick coat of this oil and wrap it with a wet bandage, so that it has the chance to permeate the skin. Read more about wet wrap therapy here.

Extra virgin coconut oil has also been proven successful in eliminating eczema scars, stretch marks and keratosis pilaris. It can also double up as a cooking ingredient!

2) Honey

Honey, particularly Manuka Honey, is good to use if you want to reduce eczema flare-ups and scars. It has anti-inflammatory properties that can help facilitate wound healing.  After washing the affected area, apply honey directly on your skin. Cover with a bandage if using straight honey as it can be sticky and messy. And don’t try this for children under two years of age due to the risk of botulism.

If you have sensitive skin and need extra exfoliation, you can mix it with sugar and gently scrub your skin with the mixture for a few minutes. However, you should be careful if you’re experiencing a severe flare-up. Scrubbing already sensitive, cracked and perhaps oozing skin is not always the best idea.

If you want all the benefits of honey, but not the sticky mess it can make, try this Organic Manuka Skin Soothing Cream, which contains olive oil, manuka honey and manuka oil. It’s known for healing eczema wounds, reducing the appearance of eczema scars, while helping soothe and provide anti-inflammatory effects to flared skin.

3) Magnesium Bath

This recipe comes straight from Wellness Mama and it’s the perfect skin healing mixture for those with eczema that can stand bathing. These types of baths are great, as they are a relatively cost effective and an easy way to help find eczema relief.

Ingredients

Directions

Add to bath and relax!

For more suggestions on how to heal eczema naturally, check out Wellness Mama’s many other tips here!

4) Face Eczema Serum

If you’re experiencing face eczema and need quick relief, coconut oil or honey can work really well. But if you’re looking to try something really light, but still moisturizing, this DIY face eczema serum from Mommypotamus is a great alternative to chemically ridden face serums on the market.

Ingredients

Directions

Add rosehip seed oil and essential oil drops to a serum container or mini spray bottle. Shake to mix all ingredients together. You can spray this along your face or neck before bed and in the morning as well.

This DIY serum is great for those suffering from eczema because rosehip seed oil promotes collagen and supports scar healing. Not to mention that it soothes eczema and psoriasis. For more information on this serum and other Mommypotamus eczema home remedies, check out her blog!

If you’re suffering from facial eczema and do not have the time to buy your own ingredients, both Organic Aloe Vera Skin Soothing Spray and Calendula Facial Cream are great alternatives. The soothing spray is a non-greasy, vegan formula that contains both aloe and calendula for quick healing. It can also be popped into the refrigerator for a cool and soothing treat. On the other hand, the facial cream contains Rooibos leaf that is anti-inflammatory, which helps reduce allergic responses and histamine release.

5) Homemade Face or Baby Wipes

If you’ve ever taken a look at the ingredients in wipes, you probably noticed that there are many preservatives and synthetic cleaners – not mention the baby wipes we have in North America are banned in Europe due to their chemical ingredients. Yikes! To whip yourself up a bulk of natural wipes is quite cost effective and very easy!

This recipe was sent to us and is a great alternative that can be customized based on specific allergies or skin types. Also perfect for eczema skin – it won’t burn!

Ingredients & Supplies

Directions

Just whisk the water, baby wash and oil/lotion together.  Add a few drops of tea tree oil too to give it some antibacterial & antiseptic properties.

If using paper towels as wipes:

  • Place the mixture into an old baby wipes container or a container like this one.
  • Put the paper towels, cut side down, into the mixture.
  • Once the paper has absorbed the material, you’ll be able to take out the cardboard core.
  • Pull the paper through the container and voila! Natural baby wipes!

If using reusable wash clothes:

  • Simply add the mixture to a spray bottle and spray onto a wash cloth.

6) Sea Salt Spray

Another one of our favorite home remedies for eczema from the Wellness Mama has to be this Sea Salt Spray that leaves skin feeling refreshed.

Ingredients

1 cup of distilled or boiled water

1 tbsp Himalayan salt (or Sea Salt)

Pinch of epsom salts or magnesium flakes 

Optional: add one of these essential oils for eczema

Directions

Add all ingredients in a cup and stir until salt is dissolved. Add to a spray bottle or glass jar for long term use. Can be used as part of your daily regimen by either directly spraying onto skin or adding with cotton pad.

If you’re suffering from dry or cracked skin, you can also calendula or chamomile tea!

7) Homemade Lotion Bars

Looking for an inexpensive dry skin lotion bar? Check out this awesome home remedy for eczema from Little House Living which is perfect for those suffering from dry skin.

Ingredients

Directions

  • Melt all ingredients in a saucepan over medium heat.
  • Place a piece of parchment paper on the surface area you’ll be working on
  • Pour the soap into the empty deodorant containers
  • Let the lotion harden and store in your bathroom, fridge or somewhere cool
  • Scrap the hardened drips off the parchment paper to use for the next batch!

For more suggestions on how to heal eczema naturally, check out Little House Living’s many other tips here!

Looking for other DIY home remedies for eczema or other skin conditions? Check out these other blog posts:

10 Natural Remedies for Eczema You Can Try at Home Today

13 Home Remedies for Eczema Scars

5 DIY Natural Remedies for Rosacea

If you’re low on time or need something relatively easy and cost effective, check out The Eczema Company’s natural eczema treatments – they are sure to bring you much needed relief.

Got any DIY home remedies for eczema of your own? Share them with us below in the comments!

Bio: Laura is a contributor and content developer for It’s An Itchy Little World. She is in no way a medical professional. Her comments, suggestions, and reflections are not intended to replace any medical advice. Always seek the help of a medical professional before undertaking any diet or lifestyle changes. Please see It’s An Itchy Little World’s disclaimer for information about affiliate links and more.

7 DIY Home Remedies for Eczema appeared first on itchylittleworld.com. Come read more about natural remedies for eczema!

itchylittleworld.com

Identifying Eczema: 6 Common Triggers – U.S. News & World Report


U.S. News & World Report
Identifying Eczema: 6 Common Triggers
U.S. News & World Report
"Eczema" actually refers to a number of skin conditions, many of which are related to allergy. The most common is atopic dermatitis, or AD, which is often triggered by food or environmental allergens. Contact dermatitis is a reaction to allergens and

eczema – Google News

Jan 1, What Is Eczema? Has Finally Joined Twitter!

Happy New Year. My first blog post of 2017 is to share that What Is Eczema? has finally become a part of the wonderful world of Twitter. It’s been a long time coming and I hope you decide to come over and follow me :) I’m looking forward to tweeting, re-tweeting and sharing anything interesting or informative. I hope to see you over there :)
Eczema Blog

The 6 Products I Use to Tame Brutal Winter Eczema Flare-ups – New York Magazine


New York Magazine
The 6 Products I Use to Tame Brutal Winter Eczema Flare-ups
New York Magazine
But it's particularly awful for eczema sufferers, whose symptoms are triggered and aggravated by the combination of icy winds and intense indoor heating. As someone who's struggled with eczema since age 3, I've spent most of my life not only trying to …

eczema – Google News

13 Skincare Ingredients & Eczema Irritants You NEED to Avoid Right Now

Another great post from itchylittleworld.com – Natural remedies for eczema to soothe your itchy little world..

If you’re suffering from any skin condition, we’re sure you’ve tried countless treatments to provide some type of relief. However, you should know that there are many skincare ingredients that can make skin conditions like acne and rosacea even worse. And we know they are very often eczema irritants, so they are very important to highlight.

This week, we take a look at the top 13 skincare ingredients you should avoid in your daily regimen – this is most important for anyone with a skin condition, but its good advice for healthy skin too.

All skincare we recommend on this blog ALWAYS avoids the following 13 chemicals.

Please keep in mind I am in no way a medical professional. If you’re experiencing severe eczema or have a topical infection, it is always best to seek medical advice immediately.

Which Skincare Ingredients to Avoid

Triclosan

This active ingredient can be found in literally any type of anti-bacterial product such as deodorants, cleansers, and hand sanitizers. There have been studies that show that this ingredient can pass through skin and interfere with hormone function.

Not only is it practically poison for our bodies, but it’s also extremely toxic to the environment [1].

Parabens

You’ve probably heard this label thrown around a lot lately. Parabens are a class of preservatives that are included in cosmetics and pharmaceutical products. Not many people know how to recognize them in products due to the list of names they go by such as methylparaben, ethylparaben, n-propylparaben and many others that for the most part all end in “paraben.”

You can mostly find Parabens in moisturizer, lipstick, foundation, concealer, eye makeup and makeup removers.

Phthalates

Similar to parabens, there is a very long list of names these chemicals go by. Essentially they are used in plastics, but are also used in personal care products to make fragrances last longer.

Fragrance or Perfume or Parfum

Really, unless it says essential oil, you’re looking at an artificial and chemical additive. They are always seen in products that have a scent. This is a very common eczema irritant and should ALWAYS be avoided when you’re dealing with dermatitis.

Siloxanes

These silicone-based compounds are seen often in cosmetics to soften, smooth and moisten skin. They also make hair products dry quickly and deodorant creams slide on more easily. You easily find them in shampoos, and body or facial creams.

Similar to Triclosan, these compounds have been shows to be toxic for humans, as well as the environment. In fact it can possibly impair human fertility [1].

PEGS

These chemicals are actually petroleum-based and are widely used in cosmetics as thickeners, softeners and moisture-carriers. Interestingly enough, they are also used in pharmaceutical laxatives.

Although all these skincare ingredients should be avoided, it looks like PEGS are actually unsafe for damaged skin. It can actually cause irritation and systemic toxicity [2].

PEGS commonly go by the name Oxynol, Ammonium laureth sulfate, as well as all ingredients that have “eth” in the name.

Oxybenzone

This is the #1 chemical that is used in sunscreens. It actually is probably one of the most toxic ingredients in skin care products and according to The Environmental Working Group it is what skin allergies react to most [3].

To avoid this one, chose a zinc based sunblock instead of a sunscreen. Read more about that in our Summer Eczema Care Guide.

Diethanolamine, Monoethanolamine, Triethanolamine (DEAs)

Most products that are either creamy or sudsy like soaps, cleaners, and shampoos will contain these harmful ingredients.

Ever wondered how your eyes get irritated by shampoo or certain soaps, often times its due to DEAs! The European Union has actually classified DEA as harmful and can cause serious damage to one’s health from prolonged exposure [1].

P-Phenylenediamine (PPD)

This chemical is often found in hair dyes. In fact, it’s very difficult to find conventional hair dyes that don’t contain this ingredient. This chemical can cause allergic reactions to those with already sensitive skin or with skin conditions.

But how bad is it for you? Well let’s put it this way. It’s used in rubber chemicals, and textile dyes and pigments. Gross!

DMDM Formaldehyde

This ingredient is used extensively in a wide range of cosmetics such as nail polish, hair products, deodorants and so much more.

If you didn’t already know, formaldehyde is already classified as a human carcinogen that can cause cancer. And it’s an embalming fluid, need I say more?

Butylated Hydroxyanisole (BHA) and Butylated Hdroxytoluene (BHT)

These chemicals are synthetic antioxidants that are used in preservatives for lipsticks, moisturizers and many other cosmetics. They are actually used in food as well.

Similarly to other harmful ingredients listed, it mimics estrogen and creates hormonal disruptors.

Citronella

This substance is also known as methyleugenol.

Studies have shown that when this substance has been administered internally to mice, it has cause tumors to appear in multiple sites. In fact, it is so toxic, Health Canada has made sure to ban it from cosmetics.

Petrolatum

You already know what petroleum jelly is! It’s been used by many over the years as a barrier to lock in moisture, as well as added to hair products to make hair shine.

However, this substance can actually be contaminated with another chemical know as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Exposure to both these harmful chemicals combined is associated with cancer. The European Union actually classifies petrolatum as a carcinogen and restricts its use in cosmetics [1].

So…What Now? 

If you’re feeling somewhat depressed after reading this article or thinking you might have to clean out your entire cosmetic cabinet, don’t fear. It’s extremely difficult to avoid all these chemicals in our daily lives, but small steps are always better than none at all!

You can start by just replacing one thing like a moisturizer. And don’t believe the hype – you can use a good natural moisturizer on every part of your body, even your face and around the eyes. A balm like Organic Manuka Skin Soothing Cream would be our suggestion for all over moisture.

If you’re ready to find a good source for non-toxic, chemical free, gentle skincare, free of eczema irritants, then we recommend The Eczema Company where you can find natural treatments for eczema as well as eczema clothing.

Do you try to avoid these skincare ingredients and eczema irritants?

How did you first learn about these chemicals?

How did you transition to all natural products?

Let us know in the comments below!

Bio: Laura Dolgy is a contributor and content developer for It’s An Itchy Little World. She is in no way a medical professional. Her comments, suggestions, and reflections are not intended to replace any medical advice. Always seek the help of a medical professional before undertaking any diet or lifestyle changes. Please see It’s An Itchy Little World’s disclaimer for information about affiliate links and more.

Sources

  1. European Commission. Regulation (EC) 1272/2008 , Annex VI, Table 3.2. Sep 2009. http://ecb.jrc.ec.europa.eu/classification-labelling
  2. Lanigan, RS (CIR Expert Panel). “Final report on the safety assessment of PPG-11 and PPG-15 stearyl ethers.” Int J Toxicol.20 Suppl 4 (2001):13-26
  3. The Trouble with Ingredients in Sunscreens. The Environmental Working Group. https://www.ewg.org/sunscreen/report/the-trouble-with-sunscreen-chemicals/#.WfvHVBNSxTY

13 Skincare Ingredients & Eczema Irritants You NEED to Avoid Right Now appeared first on itchylittleworld.com. Come read more about natural remedies for eczema!

itchylittleworld.com

talkhealth Allergy and Eczema research published in Daily Mail

In September we ran a survey to see if patients suffering with eczema are more likely to also have allergies or sensitivity to foods such as eggs, nuts, diary and wheat. The aim of the research was to find out ways to help patients manage the two conditions better and for more medical acknowledgement of the connection between the two. We were pleased to have the results published in a dedicated supplement within the Daily Mail. To see the full article please click here.

talkhealth Blog