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What Is The Best Eczema Soap?

Another great post from itchylittleworld.com – Natural remedies for eczema to soothe your itchy little world..

By Laura Dolgy (bio below)

It’s no secret that finding the best eczema soap or really sensitive skin is a nightmare. Most soaps end up leaving skin feeling dry and even more irritated. Not to mention that harsh and hot water can only exacerbate eczema symptoms. It’s enough to make us want to eliminate washing and bathing of any kind.

If you’re having trouble finding an alternative to harsh soaps, then this post is for you. This week, we’re sharing the worst and best eczema soaps.

Please keep in mind that although these treatments can relieve eczema, we are in no way medical professionals. If you’re experiencing severe eczema symptoms like fever or an infection, it is best to seek medical advice immediately.

The Truth about Soap and Eczema

As you probably already know, soap is known to dry skin out. This is mostly due to harsh chemicals that remove moisture from the skin. These chemicals can also cause severe reactions and irritation, specifically for those suffering from eczema or extremely sensitive skin.

So why is it so hard finding a soap that works with your eczema? Well to be quite honest – most (if not almost all) skincare products that exist today are loaded with nasty ingredients such as parabens, plastics or one of the worst culprit – fragrances.

To keep your skin well protected and safe from infection, opting for natural, chemical-free soaps are the best decision. They tend to be gentler and won’t dry out the skin like others will.

What is the Worst Soap for Eczema?

Aside from soap with nasty ingredients such as parabens, plastics or fragrances, there are many other types of soap that can exacerbate eczema. Here is a list of the top soaps to avoid:

Bubble baths

What kid doesn’t love a bubble bath? Or adult for that matter?! Unfortunately most bubble baths can really cause your eczema to flare up. But why are bubble baths so terrible for dry skin? Well for one, foaming agents use many chemicals that easily irritate skin. Another reason is that all soap will dry out the skin and the longer the skin is exposed to soap, as in soaking in a bubble bath, the more the skin will dry out. In fact, for baths, we suggest never using any soap until the very end and then quickly rinsing it off the skin. Never sit in soapy water for an extended period of time.

Although there are some very rare “eczema-safe” bubble baths out there, it’s best to err on the side of caution. So, we do NOT recommend bubble baths for children or adults with eczema.

Sanitizers & Foaming Soaps

Although we’ve been discussing soaps primarily for bath use, there are also many soaps that can exacerbate hand eczema. Hand sanitizers are probably one of the worst things you can use! Why? Because there is nothing else as drying as alcohol and that is the primary ingredient in most sanitizers.

Another one is foaming soap, which is extremely harsh for sensitive skin. It usually includes unsafe chemicals and ingredients made to create an overabundance of foam, but these things really irritate the skin. Hand eczema is actually very common due to chemical agents included in products such as hand cleansers and dish soap.

If you have trouble with hand eczema, make sure to read 5 Handy Ways to Keep Hand Eczema Under Control.

Scented Oils

Although this is technically not a soap, many people enjoy adding scented oils to their bath to help them unwind and relax. However, like we mentioned earlier, most fragrant type products can exacerbate eczema.

In general we suggest avoiding scented oils with added “fragrance” or “perfume.” Instead we recommend just adding drops of pure essential oils to your bath. For tips, check out The Best Essential Oils for Eczema.

What is the Best Eczema Soap?

We already mentioned there are many soaps that must be avoided for eczema, but fortunately there are many great, natural alternatives available.

If you’re suffering from dry, itchy or irritated eczema, it’s always best to opt for a product that contains either olive oil or a fatty base like shea to nurture your skin and not strip it of moisture like commercial brands will. We don’t find coconut oil only bases to be rich and moisturizing enough, so in general we don’t recommend those, although they are natural.

This Emily Skin Soothers Soap for Eczema contains natural Chinese herbs, as well as olive oil, coconut oil, shea butter and many more natural and eczema safe ingredients. Not only is it perfect as a bathing soap for eczema, but it can also be doubled up for showering. It is both nourishing and extremely moisturizing for the driest skin. We’ve heard it works great for shampoo too if you have shorter hair.

Alternatively, if you’re looking for a bottled soap, the above product is also available in liquid form, arguably even better as a shampoo. Check out this natural body wash for eczema.

We mentioned that we love olive oil based soaps, but we find tallow pretty great as well. This Grass Fed Tallow Soap is made with the purest form of grass fed tallow and is extremely nourishing and moisturizing. Not only is it excellent for eczema, but it’s simple ingredients are gentle enough for sensitive and allergy-prone skin.

Lastly, the 20% Pine Tar Soap is both anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory, which makes it perfect for eczema, psoriasis and rosacea. Pine tar is actually known to speed up the growth of new skin cells and helps restore the appearance of skin. This eczema soap can also double up as a shampoo for scalp eczema, psoriasis and dandruff.

Although soap for eczema might be difficult to find, it’s not impossible. As discussed, there are a variety of different natural, eczema-safe alternatives that can be provide soothing and nourishing relief.

Have you found the best eczema soap?

Share it with us in the comments below!

Bio: Laura is a contributor and content developer for It’s An Itchy Little World. She is in no way a medical professional. Her comments, suggestions, and reflections are not intended to replace any medical advice. Always seek the help of a medical professional before undertaking any diet or lifestyle changes. Please see It’s An Itchy Little World’s disclaimer for information about affiliate links and more.

 

 

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When to Follow-Up with a Dermatologist for Eczema Care

Another great post from itchylittleworld.com – Natural remedies for eczema to soothe your itchy little world..

By Lauren Snitzer, MD, U.S. Dermatology Partners (see bio below)

If you’ve already been diagnosed with eczema, how do you know when it’s time to go back to the dermatologist for eczema care?

You’re already painfully familiar with the uncomfortable symptoms of eczema: red, itchy, cracked, blistered and inflamed skin. For some, flare-ups occur sporadically and cause severe symptoms. For others, it’s a chronic condition with milder symptoms.

Though eczema is an extremely common skin condition that affects some 31 million Americans, there currently is no cure. However, there are many different treatments to manage the symptoms of eczema. A dermatologist can help you find the right treatment — or combination of treatments — that works best for you.

So, once you have been diagnosed with eczema, when should you go back to the dermatologist for eczema care? Here are some general guidelines to help you out:

#1: Changing your bathing routine hasn’t helped.

Treatments for eczema vary depending on the cause and severity of your condition, but the first line of defense against dry, irritated, itchy skin is to restore moisture to your skin. Try bathing in lukewarm water (hot water can irritate and further dry your skin), using a mild, fragrance-free soap that doesn’t dry your skin and blotting your skin dry with a towel.

ILW Recommends these gentle, natural eczema soaps.

Another recommendation to avoiding eczema flare-ups is to use a high-quality moisturizer immediately after bathing and again several times throughout the day to build a barrier against dryness. Most dermatologists also recommend bathing and moisturizing at night so your moisture has a chance to fully absorb into your skin.

ILW Recommends these natural eczema creams.

If changing your bathing routine hasn’t helped, it’s time to see your dermatologist to determine what changes can be made.

#2: Your skin becomes infected.

Unfortunately, it is very common for people with eczema to develop infections caused by staphylococcal or streptococcal bacteria. Because the skin is dry and often split — made worse by constant scratching — bacteria is able to easily get into the deeper layers of skin. Scratching dry skin can also help spread the infection.

ILW Recommends eczema mittens or gloves to prevent scratching and infection.

“If you are suffering from a skin infection related to your eczema, consult with your dermatologist immediately,” says Dr. Lauren Snitzer of U.S. Dermatology Partners of Houston – Sugar Land. “An antibiotic may be needed to clear up the infection before you can go back to focusing on treating the eczema itself.”

#3: Your eczema causes extreme redness, dehydration, hypothermia or swelling.

Erythroderma is a rare and severe skin condition that is caused by a number of conditions, one of which is eczema. Characterized by widespread scaling on the skin over more than 90% of the body, the condition is very serious and can even be fatal if left untreated.

Typically, erythrodermic eczema occurs in individuals with unstable or worsening eczema and can be triggered by infection, drug reactions and other factors. In-patient treatment is usually required, and complications can include dehydration, hypothermia, swelling, heart failure or even death. If you experience severe symptoms such as excessive redness, swelling, dehydration or extreme discomfort, it’s time for a professional to take a closer look.

#4: Your eczema is impacting your overall well-being.

It isn’t unusual for a chronic illness or visible skin condition such as eczema to have an impact on your overall self-confidence. If your eczema is negatively affecting your daily life, impacting the way you feel about yourself or keeping you from doing activities you enjoy, call your dermatologist.

Eczema should not cause you to suffer or withdraw socially. There are many different treatment options available to manage your eczema, reduce your symptoms and prevent or control flare-ups. Your dermatologist can work with you to find the right treatment plan. If your eczema is causing psychological distress and interfering with your daily activities, seek out a counselor to help get you through these difficult emotions.

ILW Recommends: Read more about the emotional impact of eczema.

Bio: Dr. Lauren Snitzer is a board-certified physician with U.S. Dermatology Partners, which combines the personal level of care found in private dermatology practices with the benefits of a network of physicians working closely together. As the second largest physician-owned dermatology practice in the United States, we have more than 50 locations throughout Texas and the Midwest.

Check out the free eBook from U.S. Dermatology Partners, “The Top 5 Signs It’s Time to Find a Dermatologist.”

When to Follow-Up with a Dermatologist for Eczema Care appeared first on itchylittleworld.com. Come read more about natural remedies for eczema!

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9 Natural Remedies for Psoriasis You Should Try

Another great post from itchylittleworld.com – Natural remedies for eczema to soothe your itchy little world..

by Laura Dolgy (see bio below)

If you didn’t already know, psoriasis affects as many as 125 million people worldwide. It is known as a chronic autoimmune disease that is characterized by thick skin plaque that cause itching, scaling and pain. If you’re suffering from psoriasis, then we know how difficult it can be to find a proper natural treatment that actually works. This week, we’re sharing our top 9 natural remedies for psoriasis.

Please keep in mind that although these recommendations might relieve psoriasis, we are in no way medical professionals. If you’re experiencing severe psoriasis symptoms like fever or an infection, it is best to seek medical advice immediately. It’s also important to seek medical attention immediately if you begin to suffer from psoriatic arthritis.

1. Moisturize

The first step in treating your itchy and possibly painful psoriasis is by keeping skin calm and moisturized. Although this skin condition is an auto-immune response, it’s important to keep skin well hydrated.

Organic Manuka Skin Soothing Cream

The hugely popular Organic Manuka Skin Soothing Cream is extremely moisturizing and perfect for psoriasis and quite a few other skin conditions due to its wound healing abilities. Not only is it anti-bacterial, but its rich, nutrient ingredients like Manuka oil, Manuka honey and beeswax help keep plaque and scaling under control.

Emily Skin Soothers Soap with Chinese Herbs

For an alternative to drying, harsh soaps, keep your skin moisturized with this Emily Skin Soothers Soap. It’s both rich and fatty and won’t irritate the skin further. Plus – it won’t sting or burn, which makes it a great option for psoriasis.

Do you have scalp psoriasis? This gentle soap can also double up as a shampoo. Or try the body wash instead for the body and hair.

Organic Aloe Vera Skin Soothing Spray

If you haven’t tried soothing your psoriasis with aloe vera, then you should definitely start! Not only is aloe vera great for relieving itchiness, but it is also a refreshing and cooling treatment. Looking for the absolutely most natural option, pick up an aloe vera plant at a local flower shop. But if that’s not an option, try this Organic Aloe Vera Skin Soothing Spray which is perfect for relieving itchy body psoriasis. Its non-greasy formula makes for a great scalp spray too.

To further beat the itch, try popping this spray into the refrigerator overnight. It will feel great on your scaly, itchy skin!

Looking for more skincare ideas? Check out these natural remedies for psoriasis.

2. Wet/Dry Wrap Therapy

If you haven’t looked into healing your psoriasis with wet or dry wrap therapy, then look no further. Many psoriasis sufferers have felt relief from these two therapies. For more information on wet wrap therapy, make sure to check out our post: Our Eczema Trials: Wet Wrap Therapy. Alternatively, for dry wrap therapy, take a look at our blog post: Our Eczema Trials: Dry Wrap Therapy.

WrapESoothe Body Bands for Kids & Adults

If you or your little one are experiencing psoriasis on arms or legs exclusively, then these WrapESoothe Body Bands for both children and adults are just the ticket. These bands work exceptionally well for wet wrapping, as they help balms and creams penetrate the skin for full relief.

GoumiHat

If your little one is experiencing cradle cap – which is a form of baby psoriasis – then make sure to check out this GoumiHat. Just like the body bands above, this hat can be used in both wet and dry wrap therapy. The bamboo/cotton fabric blend is both breathable, antimicrobial and prevents scalp scratching.

SkintoSkin Clothing

If you’re looking for clothing that does not exacerbate your psoriasis symptoms, but rather calms the skin, make sure to check out this SkintoSkin clothing line that features zinc, silver and algae. There are a variety of clothing pieces for babies to adults such as baby onesies, leggings, sports bras, shirts, boxers and much more. Like the products above, all these pieces can be used for wet and dry wrapping.

3. Reduce Stress

A huge trigger of psoriasis tends to be stress. There are many different activities and hobbies you can take on to help reduce and manage your stress levels such as yoga, meditation and exercise. Getting a professional massage can also help reduce your stress!

4. Phototherapy

Similarly to eczema, psoriasis can be relieved with UVB phototherapy. Similarly to natural sunlight, this ultraviolet light penetrates skin and slows the growth of affected skin cells.

If you are thinking of treating your psoriasis with phototherapy, it is very important to seek medical attention first to conclude whether this treatment is appropriate for you.

5. Eating Well/Elimination Diet

If you are not eating properly and notice that your psoriasis is flaring up from certain foods, then you need to start thinking about healing from within.

For some great ideas on adopting a new diet to heal your psoriasis, consult these blog posts that discuss diets for eczema. Although a different skin condition, the same diets can be applied to psoriasis with great results for your skin and overall health.

The Eczema Diet and Your Salicylate Sensitivity

How Eating A Plant Based Diet For Eczema Encourages Healing

How Eczema Helped My Family Move To A Clean Healthy Diet

If you also believe that your psoriasis might be affected by certain foods, make sure to check out our blog post: Our Eczema Elimination Diet Success (How You Can Do It Too!).

6. Homeopathy

If you’re interested in alternative medicine, then you might want to check out homeopathic medicine. Similarly to eczema, homeopathy can be successful in healing psoriasis.

To learn more about homeopathy and how it works, make sure to check out our post: How Does Homeopathy for Eczema Work? Although some of the remedies might be different for psoriasis, you can expect the same type of consultation and treatment.

7. Essential Oils

If you’re dealing with itchy, uncomfortable patches of psoriasis, essential oils can be used to provide some relief. It’s important to remember that essential oils aren’t recommended as a primary treatment, but instead as a compliment to your regular treatment or regimen.

Different types of essential oils for treating psoriasis include tea tree oil, castor oil, lavender oil, geranium oil, and many others [1].

8. Bathing

To soothe psoriasis pain and itching, taking warm (never hot) baths can help. However, it’s important to make sure the water is lukewarm and to limit bathing time as well.

To soothe skin even more, try pairing your bath with a natural soothing soap like Emily Skin Soothers Liquid Soap or this Conqueror Oatmeal Bath for Eczema that contains Colloidal oatmeal as well as dead sea salt, vitamin C, baking soda and coconut milk powder. Just never, ever sit in soapy water, which will severely dry out and irritate the skin. Use the soap at the end of your bath, immediately rinse off, towel dry and apply a good rich moisturizer like the ones listed above.

9. Natural Supplements

Lastly, natural supplements have shown to be effective in easing psoriasis itching and pain. Vitamins such as vitamin D can counteract the body’s response to inflammation present in psoriasis. This Vitamin D by Pure is top quality and in a very clean, allergy free liquid formula, which we love.

Read more about Vitamin D.

Omega-3 fatty acids have been shown to actually decrease inflammation and it seems they also have a positive impact on the body’s immune system. However, there is somewhat mixed research on whether omega-3 fatty acid supplements can help reduce the severity of psoriasis [2].

Omega-3 fatty acids can be found in many foods such as fatty fish and algae, but you can also properly supplement as well. We like Nordic Naturals for Kids and Adults.

Psoriasis may be a tricky skin condition, but it doesn’t mean that it needs to consume your life. For more resources and research on psoriasis, make sure to check out the National Psoriasis Foundation.

Read More About Psoriasis:

Psoriasis Is So Much More Than a Skin Disease

Developing Thick Skin, Coping With Psoriasis As A Child

Do you suffer from psoriasis? Let us know what type of natural remedies for psoriasis you use!

Resources

  1. Can you use oils to treat psoriasis? https://www.healthline.com/health/essential-oils-for-psoriasis
  2. Vitamins and Supplements. https://www.psoriasis.org/treating-psoriasis/complementary-and-alternative/diet-and-nutrition/vitamins-and-supplements

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How to Naturally Heal Eyelid Eczema

Another great post from itchylittleworld.com – Natural remedies for eczema to soothe your itchy little world..

By Laura Dolgy (bio below)

Do you ever experience itchy or swollen eyelids? Although eyelid eczema can be caused by a variety of external or internal factors, most cases are characterized by itching, stinging and/or burning. It is also quite common to experience red, swollen or flaky skin as well.

If you’re suffering from this inflammatory condition, we’re here to help you heal your eczema both naturally and safely.

Please keep in mind that although these treatments can relieve eczema, we are in no way medical professionals. If you’re experiencing severe eczema symptoms like fever or an infection, it is best to seek medical advice immediately.

Prior to discussing tips and recommendations for eczema on eyelids, it’s important to first discuss why this type of eczema occurs.

Atopic Dermatitis vs Atopic Contact Dermatitis vs. Irritant Contact Dermatitis

If you are experiencing red, itchy or flaky skin around the eyes due to topical exposure to certain metals, personal care products or pet dander, then you are most likely suffering from atopic contact dermatitis. This essentially means that your eye eczema is triggered from exposure to a topical allergen.

Alternatively, irritant contact dermatitis is an eye rash that is triggered by a specific irritant such as chemicals, solvents, adhesives and very hot or cold temperatures. The irritant can enter the eye area, cause friction and damage leading to temporary discomfort and redness.

If you can determine that neither of the above types of contact dermatitis relate to your flare up, then you likely have atopic dermatitis. This is an internal reaction expressed through the skin and often triggered by things like stress, consuming certain foods, seasonal or environmental allergies, etc.

Although these types of dermatitis may be triggered differently, their symptoms are quite similar.

It’s best to get a physician’s diagnosis to properly diagnosis your skin condition just to be sure. Your eye area is very sensitive and we don’t recommend taking any chances.

Symptoms of Eyelid Eczema

If you already suffer from eyelid eczema, then you probably already know the uncomfortable and annoying symptoms associated with the condition.

These include:

  • Changes in eye appearance (i.e. an extra fold of skin above or under the eye, eyelids darken)
  • Inflamed, red eyelids
  • Scaly or flaking skin
  • Itching

Although rare, those suffering from atopic eyelid eczema can also experience complications such as cataracts, spontaneous retinal detachment and scarring.

To best avoid these complications, it is always best to seek medical attention immediately, once symptoms are difficult to handle. It’s also important to make sure not to rub or scratch the area in order to avoid skin infections and eye problems as mentioned above.

How to Heal Eyelid Eczema

As stated prior, it’s important to never scratch your eye eczema. Scratching can cause further harm not only to the skin, but to your eye as well.

If you are suffering from eyelid eczema due to irritants, then your first step should be asking yourself what might be the main cause of your eczema:

  • Do my eyes itch or swell after I pet my dog, cat, etc?
  • Do my eyes tear and/or itch when I use a certain type of mascara, eye shadow or eyeliner?
  • Do my eyes change in appearance based on temperature?
  • Have I gotten an insect bite on or near my eyelid recently?

If you are able to answer at least one of these questions, then treatment is quite simple. Think about removing the allergen or irritant that might be causing your eczema to trigger.

Obviously, getting rid of your pet might seem a little drastic, but try to keep their dander/saliva away from your eyelids. Perhaps wash your hands immediately after petting them or keep your face at a distance (depending on how severe the eczema is). Keeping them off your bed and sofa and anywhere you may rest your head is a good idea as well.

Alternatively, if you cannot identify the source of your eczema, then your condition might need a little more care.

Treatments for Eyelid Eczema 

Eyelid Creams         

There are thousands of eyelid creams that can be found in stores; however, many are made with unsafe, harsh ingredients.

Because eyelid skin tends to be thinner and more sensitive, it’s best to opt for products that are more natural in order to fully soothe your eczema and not irritate your eye further.

Our editor’s favorite product for the eyes or face or anywhere on the body is the Organic Manuka Skin Soothing Cream. Keep in mind this is a creamy balm so it’s very thick and rich and a little goes a long way. Some people who are used to light facial lotions, may find this product too heavy and may prefer our next suggestion.

Gentle and natural is just what is required and that’s why we love Calendula Facial Cream. This cream is both gentle and cooling, as it contains both Organic Calendula flowers and Organic Aloe juice. It contains Dimethylaminoethanol (DMAE), a natural supplement that is anti-inflammatory in nature and also provides skin firming and anti-aging benefits as well.

To gently cleanse the eyes and face, be sure to check out this natural Organic Calendula Face Wash. Similar to the ingredients in the cream mentioned above, this face wash is gentle with its blend of soothing herbs and will help calm red, inflamed skin. It’s also an excellent face wash for extremely sensitive skin. The wash and cream work really well together.

Wet or Dry Wrap Therapy

If you’re experiencing extremely itchy and inflamed eczema, then you can always try adapting wet or dry wrap therapy for eczema around the eyes.

Both wet and dry wrap therapy are common processes used among eczema sufferers and can be used as a short-term fix for moderate to severe eczema. To read more about these methods, make sure to check out both our blog posts: Our Eczema Trials – Wet Wrap Therapy And Our Eczema Trials: Dry Wrapping.

Instead of using body bands or clothing, feel free to use bandages or cut out strips of clothing to drape over the eyes. Or easier yet, a sleep mask, but make sure it’s made of natural, not cheap synthetic materials. We like these cotton eye masks with no extra padding. NEVER use cortisone or a pro-topic medication for this method. The eyelids are extremely sensitive and you do not want to risk damaging your eyes.

Elimination Diet

Lastly, if you feel like you have tried everything and have been unsuccessful, perhaps it is time to look at what foods may be triggering your eye eczema.

Many eczema sufferers have found relief and treatment by simply changing their diet.

If you think your eyelid eczema might be triggered by food, then we suggest checking out our post: Our Eczema Elimination Diet Success (How You Can Do it Too!). An elimination diet is essentially removing certain foods from your diet for a specific time period and then reintroducing them slowly to determine which foods are causing a reaction.

Do you suffer from eyelid eczema?

Let us know how you treat it in the comments below!

Bio: Laura is a contributor and content developer for It’s An Itchy Little World. She is in no way a medical professional. Her comments, suggestions, and reflections are not intended to replace any medical advice. Always seek the help of a medical professional before undertaking any diet or lifestyle changes. Please see It’s An Itchy Little World’s disclaimer for information about affiliate links and more.

How to Naturally Heal Eyelid Eczema appeared first on itchylittleworld.com. Come read more about natural remedies for eczema!

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How to Soothe Eczema During Pregnancy

Another great post from itchylittleworld.com – Natural remedies for eczema to soothe your itchy little world..

By Laura Dolgy (bio below)

You probably already know that pregnancy can affect a woman’s body in many ways, but did you know that many experience eczema during pregnancy? With an influx of hormones and body changes, it’s not very surprising that eczema can creep up. Although there is some information about pregnancy-induced eczema (also known as atopic eruption in pregnancy, prurigo of pregnancy, pruritic folliculitis of pregnancy and papular dermatoses of pregnancy) we have some tricks up our sleeves for dealing with eczema during pregnancy.

Please keep in mind that although these treatments can relieve eczema, we are in no way medical professionals. If you’re experiencing severe eczema symptoms like fever or an infection, it is best to seek medical advice immediately.

Is Eczema During Pregnancy Common?

Although pregnancy can cause eczema, fluctuations in hormones can also cause a variety of different skin issues, such as:

  • Acne
  • Skin pigmentation changes
  • Dark spots
  • Rashes
  • Skin sensitivity and more

Surprisingly enough, it seems that pregnancy-induced eczema is possibly the most common skin condition that occurs during pregnancy [1]. This type of eczema can also begin during pregnancy without ever experiencing the skin condition before. Although annoying and uncomfortable, this condition does not harm the baby and usually improves after the baby is born.

What Symptoms Can You Expect with Eczema In Pregnancy?

There are two forms of atopic eruption:

  • Eczematous (E-type AEP): This type of eczema is characterized by rough and red patches that usually appear on the face, neck, creases of elbows and on the back of knees
  • Prurigo (P-type AEP): This type of pregnancy eczema appears in several bumps that are widespread on the abdomen, arms and legs [1].

What Treatments Help with Pregnancy Eczema?

Moisturize

If you are suffering from eczema during pregnancy, then the first thing you might want to try is keeping your skin moisturized during your flare-up. This gives skin the opportunity to properly heal by providing moisture to your already dry, sensitive skin. And with a bun in the oven, you want to stick to the most natural of ingredients of course! 

Organic Manuka Honey Skin Soothing Cream

This soothing skin cream is the perfect nourishing natural treatment for pregnant women experiencing eczema. Not only is it gentle, but it contains simple ingredients such as Manuka honey, Manuka oil and Beeswax that keep skin smooth and moisturized. Plus it’s anti-bacterial too, so it’s great for soothing cracked, open skin. 

Grass Fed Tallow Balm

If you’ve never tried grass fed tallow in skin care, then you are definitely missing out. Tallow Balm is extremely nourishing and moisturizing. It also promotes healing and heals scarring on sensitive, allergy prone or eczema skin. Comes in two varieties: Unscented (for very sensitive skin) and Tea Tree & Lavender (added antibacterial properties and a lovely scent). 

Organic Calendula Salve

Calendula is full of vitamins, antioxidants, essential fatty acids, plant compounds and natural enzymes. It contains a selection of natural ingredients such as Calendula flowers, Beeswax, Olive oil and more. Organic Calendula Salve works wonders on dry, cracked or sensitive skin and can also be used on your newborn.

Eczema Clothing

In addition to moisturizing and natural eczema treatments, opting for eczema clothing (in order to not to scratch or infect your eczema) is also a popular choice for those suffering from itchy eczema.

Bamboo Gloves for Adults

If you happen to be suffering from hand eczema or cannot stop scratching the eczema elsewhere on your body, then you’ll want to check out these Bamboo Gloves for Adults. These gloves are made with biodegradable bamboo and have a nice cooling effect. Plus – they won’t stretch out overtime like ordinary cotton gloves. Wear them overnight with cream underneath for relief in the morning.

Body Bands for Adults

If you’re experiencing targeted eczema either on your elbows, knees, arms or legs, then make sure to check out these WrapESoothe Body Bands for Adults. They work well at keeping skin protected and covered from infection.

Many eczema sufferers also have had success using these bands for wet or dry therapy. To discover more about wet therapy and how it can help relieve your itchy, dry eczema quickly, check out our blog post: Our Eczema Trials: Wet Wrap Therapy. Alternatively, if you’re interested in trying dry wrapping, make sure to take a look at our blog post: Our Eczema Trials: Dry Wrapping.

Phototherapy

Many eczema sufferers who cannot get relief turn to light therapy, also known as phototherapy. In fact, this is the form of treatment recommended to pregnant women by Dr. Peter Lio. The most common type of phototherapy used to treat eczema is narrowband ultraviolet light. Essentially this light acts as natural sunlight that has displayed eczema healing abilities.

This process is generally safe for pregnant women, but sunscreen can be applied to the face to avoid melasma (a condition common in pregnant women that causes brown spots) [3].

Before choosing this treatment, it’s always best to talk to a doctor to decide whether this is the best course of action for treating your eczema.

Manage your Stress

To really help your eczema, it’s important to keep stress to a minimum. In fact studies show that a mother’s stress can harm the fetus’ brain development as early as 17 weeks [2]. It’s also important to remember that stress can increase your chances for an eczema flare-up.

To help reduce your eczema, try adopting a new hobby or start looking into yoga or meditation. Another great idea is getting a pre-natal massage! Just make sure that your therapist checks the massage oil to make sure there are no irritants that can exacerbate your eczema.

Eating Well

If the above is not working for your eczema, then you may want to take a look at what you’re eating instead. If you are not eating well or consuming foods that are actually exacerbating your eczema, then you might want to think about changing your diet, but only do so under a physician’s supervision.

For some great ideas on adopting a new diet to heal your pregnancy eczema, make sure to check out these blog posts:

The Eczema Diet and Your Salicylate Sensitivity

How Eating A Plant Based Diet For Eczema Encourages Healing

How Eczema Helped My Family Move To A Clean Healthy Diet

If you believe certain foods are actually exacerbating your eczema, you’ll want to check out our blog post: Our Eczema Elimination Diet Success (How You Can Do It Too!). Many eczema sufferers have been able to clear their eczema through their diet alone and eliminating foods that trigger their eczema. Just make sure to do any dietary changes along with a physician to be sure you’re not causing harm to your body or your growing baby’s development.

We know that pregnancy cravings can make dietary changes difficult, but healing your eczema from within can be the one step to healing your eczema for good.

Remember though, it’s ESSENTIAL to check with your doctor (especially during pregnancy) whether any dietary changes are appropriate for you and your baby.

Are you pregnant and suffering from eczema? We’d love to hear from you in the comments below.

Bio: Laura is a contributor and content developer for It’s An Itchy Little World. She is in no way a medical professional. Her comments, suggestions, and reflections are not intended to replace any medical advice. Always seek the help of a medical professional before undertaking any diet or lifestyle changes. Please see It’s An Itchy Little World’s disclaimer for information about affiliate links and more.

Resources

 

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How to Treat Scaly Eczema

Another great post from itchylittleworld.com – Natural remedies for eczema to soothe your itchy little world..

By Laura Dolgy (bio below)

If you’ve ever experienced extremely thick, dry skin that resembles a “crocodile” feel to it, then this post is for you. This week, we’re sharing our top recommendations for treating scaly eczema.

The first step in treating your scaly eczema is using a proper natural cream or balm that can help nourish the skin and renew moisture.

Please keep in mind that although these treatments can relieve eczema, we are in no way medical professionals. If you’re experiencing severe eczema symptoms like fever or an infection, it is best to seek medical advice immediately.

Top Scaly Eczema Skin Care Products

Emily Skin Soothers Super Dry

This Emily Skin Soothers treatment for thick, dry eczema is wonderful for healing rough skin on body, hands and feet. The beeswax, organic sunflower oil and Chinese herbs promote circulation and accelerate healing that’s needed to soothe cracked, chapped or scaly skin.

EczeHerbal #3- Dry Eczema Treatment for Adults

If you experience chronic dry, scaly and thickening of the skin, then make sure to check out this EczeHerbal #3 treatment that was made for dry eczema.

Made with traditional Chinese Medicine, this treatment is designed to be used on chronic eczema that lingers. Not only is this product GMO free, but it can also be used on pets!

Grass Fed Tallow Balm (Paleo Skin Care)

Tallow balm is one of the purest forms of skin care, yet still is extremely moisturizing and nourishing for scaly, dry eczema. This Grass Fed Tallow Balm uses tallow that is sourced from grass fed and finished cows and is both suitable for Paleo and GAPS diets.

This balm is also available in two different scents: Tea Tree & Lavender as well as an unscented formula. The first uses tea tree & lavender essential oils that are natural antibiotics and antiseptics, which promote healing and prevent scarring. The unscented formula is perfect to use on the most sensitive skin.

Organic Manuka Skin Soothing Cream

This cream is a true treat for those that suffer from dry, scaly and itchy eczema. Not only is there beeswax that helps keep skin moisturized, but the manuka honey also has anti-bacterial properties. Plus – it will not burn or sting skin. It’s a very popular product – be sure to check out Organic Manuka Skin Soothing Cream.

Wrap Therapy

If you still are not having any luck healing your scaly eczema with just using the products above, then you should look into wet and dry therapy. These methods of treating skin conditions like eczema or psoriasis can be carried out on adults, children and babies.

Wet Wrap Therapy

Wet wrap therapy is a common process used among eczema sufferers and is usually used as a short-term fix for moderate to severe eczema. If you have not tried this method yet, then make sure to check out our blog post: Our Eczema Trials – Wet Wrap Therapy.

All that is needed is a bath, one of the creams/balms above and a set of warmed and wet clothing/bandages/dressings. Although in no way a cure for your eczema, the effects after one treatment can be extremely positive and can give you some much needed relief.

Dry Wrap Therapy

Just like wet wrap therapy, this method requires one of the creams/balms mentioned above and dry clothing/bandages/dressings. It’s definitely the easier of the wrapping methods and is the one we like to recommend trying first. For more information on what dry wrapping is and how it works, check out our post: Our Eczema Trials: Dry Wrapping.

Elimination Diet

If you have exhausted all the options above, then perhaps it is time to start looking within to heal your eczema. Many eczema sufferers waste a lot of time and money buying treatments or miracle cures, when their eczema can actually be healed from what they eat and don’t eat.

If you think your scaly eczema might be due to food, or even if you don’t (skeptical?) , then we recommend checking out our post: Our Eczema Elimination Diet Success (How You Can Do it Too!). An elimination diet is essentially removing certain foods from your diet for a specific time period and then reintroducing them slowly to determine which foods are causing a reaction. Many of our blog subscribers have found relief just by eliminating a specific food that was causing their skin to flare-up, including our founder and editor, Jennifer Roberge’s son. Read more about their story here.

However, keep in mind that an elimination diet will work best with a physician or nutritionist to ensure all the proper foods are eliminated correctly AND to guarantee you’re not putting your or your child’s health in jeopardy.

Want to learn more about Eczema and how to heal? Read our Start Here for Eczema Relief guide to get you started!

Do you suffer from thick, dry eczema?

Let us know which natural treatments for scaly eczema work for you in the comments below!

Bio: Laura is a contributor and content developer for It’s An Itchy Little World. She is in no way a medical professional. Her comments, suggestions, and reflections are not intended to replace any medical advice. Always seek the help of a medical professional before undertaking any diet or lifestyle changes. Please see It’s An Itchy Little World’s disclaimer for information about affiliate links and more.

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6 Inspiring Tips for Living with Eczema Based on the Power of Trust & Acceptance

Another great post from itchylittleworld.com – Natural remedies for eczema to soothe your itchy little world..

This week, we’re sharing an inspirational video from my dear friend Marieke, a certified life coach and founder of Your Novel Life, whose own daughter had severe eczema as an infant. If you’re feeling particularly low or depressed due to living with eczema or dealing with your child’s eczema, then please watch this beautiful video. I’m sure you will find it’s message of trust and acceptance enriching for both your body and mind.

♥ Jennifer

 

(begin transcript)

Hi everybody! I’m a life coach from Your Novel Life. I’m here today to share some tips with you about what I wish I knew then when I was handling my baby’s eczema before I became a life coach.

My daughter is now 7-years-old and she’s dairy intolerant. Our journey with her eczema started right as she was about 4 months old and I had noticed that her cradle cap started migrating to her face. She had small patches on her body but nothing too major. It was really when it started migrating to her face that I freaked out and I didn’t know what to do. I had never seen cradle cap like that. I started to think maybe it was eczema, so I started researching. And what I found was that it was probably really bad eczema.

Because I tend to go more of a natural route, I discovered that it was probably related to food, but I wasn’t really sure. So I visited my doctor with Fira (my daughter) and I described what was happening. My doctor actually told me that there is no conclusive evidence between eczema and food issues and I just felt that couldn’t be right, something seemed off. I’m a big believer that food is medicine. 

1. Trust Your Gut & Intuition

Here’s where my first tip comes in to play: trust your own gut and intuition. I consulted with some naturopaths that told me the biggest allergen I was consuming was dairy. When I eliminated it from my own and my daughter’s diet at six months of age, I noticed a difference in my daughter’s skin every two weeks (I was still breastfeeding at this time) and a change in my health as well. Her skin just started clearing up and by the time she was a year-old she was basically eczema-free. So, I trusted my gut and my gut was right.

One of the other ways we handled her painful eczema (she would just cry for hours from the pain and I could sense her internal frustration) was by soothing her with a pacifier. I had never been big on the pacifier before then, but for some reason I had one laying around during one particularly bad moment where I couldn’t settle her. I gave her the pacifier and she took it immediately. It’s like all her frustrations went out into the pacifier. She found an outlet for herself. She found a way to soothe herself. Nothing else had worked for us, so I trusted my gut, that the little plastic device would do something. I had tried everything to soothe her and I was at my wits end. So, that pacifier become her go-to self-soother very quickly. Even after her eczema was gone and she was a little bit older, she would still use the pacifier to calm herself.

So my first tip I want to share with you is: Trust your gut. Trust yourself that you know how to care for your child.

2. Find Acceptance

My next tip is acceptance. I know how hard it can be to accept that your baby has some kind skin condition or intestinal issue or allergy or intolerance, that they are living with eczema. I personally found that challenging. I also found the fact that I was going to have to give up cheese or cream in my coffee really, really scary. I didn’t feel like doing it. I felt like I had just going through pregnancy where I’d given up alcohol and I felt like I was just getting my body back and I just wanted to do whatever I wanted to do. But I realized that wasn’t going to happen when I discovered that the issue with my daughter’s eczema was dairy. So acceptance is my next tip I want to share with you, my lesson learned. Suffering stems from not accepting what is. At the time my daughter was suffering form eczema and I had this intuition that it was dairy and I didn’t want to accept that. But once I did decide to move forward with that, once I accepted it, MAN things got easier. So, that’s my tip, accept what is. Accept what you’re willing to do or not do (because not doing anything is okay too). 

3. Feel Your Feelings

The next tip I would suggest for anyone watching this video is to feel ALL the feelings. When I was dealing with my daughter’s eczema I had grief, frustration, resentment, fear and I struggled to come to terms with everything. I struggled to give myself the permission to let myself feel those things. Especially grief, that was a big one. So let yourself feel sad for what you’re giving up, for that fact that your baby’s eczema makes them look different. Let yourself feel sad. It’s important to let yourself feel frustrated that you or your child is living with eczema, then move on. When we resist our feelings, things just persist. Give yourself the freedom and the grace to really FEEL what you’re feeling. Write them in a journal. Talk about them with somebody. But  don’t stay there and get stuck. Because when we get stuck, we don’t make progress and move forward. It’s when we don’t heal. And healing is what this is ultimately about.  

4. Be Empowered

My next tip is about feeling empowered and knowing that you can DO something. There is ALWAYS something you can do. Let go of the shoulds and realize you have a choice in the way you handle this. Don’t think about it as I need or should cut out dairy, but instead as I’m choosing to cut dairy because I’m willing to see if it makes a difference in my or my child’s health. I’m choosing to not eat eggs or soy or use certain creams. It’s a choice that we make on how we care for ourselves or our children. It’s a choice. We have other choices. But when we say should, it takes away our power. When we say I’m willing to do this, I’m choosing to do this, we’re standing in our power because we realize we have a choice.   Making your own decisions for you and your family is actually really powerful and I invite you to feel into the power while you navigate these waters.

5. Talk About It

My next tip is to get support, share your story, reach out and connect with others. As soon as I started talking about my own frustrations, my own fears, my own experiences with my daughter’s eczema WOW, people started coming out of the woodwork so to speak. When you show that vulnerability, sharing bits of yourself like that, people open up as well and we connect and create community. We can inspire each other. When I cut out dairy, I shared my daughter’s story with so many people because it ultimately changed her life and mine. Which leads me to my last tip…

6. Find the Blessing

This is a beautiful way to BE in life, especially when we’re faced with hardship. Think how could this be happening for me, not too me. One of the wonderful things that has come out of my daughter’s having eczema was her healing, but also how my own health improved ten-fold. It was such a blessing for me to go through the experience because I’m actually a healthier mom, I get less agitated. I had constipation for years that went away when I went dairy free.  I didn’t realize I had any sort of dairy sensitivity until I went through this with my daughter.  Another blessing is also that we’re much more aware of other people’s sensitivities and intolerances. Also, about the power of food. I always had this intuition that food was powerful, but now I saw it with my own eyes and that’s amazing! It’s an amazing gift to pass on to our children and families.

Accept everything as a blessing. Think about how changing your child’s life is a true blessing that you can pass onto your family or others you know. I’ve shared my story with our neighbors and other friends who have seen improvements in their own children’s health after cutting out dairy.

That’s my story. I hope that this has been helpful! To recap…..

  • Trust your gut. Follow your intuition. And if you don’t feel like you have one, get quiet with yourself – think and feel into what could be the issue. If you have a gut feeling, trust it.
  • Acceptance, accepting what is. We can ease our suffering when we release our resistance to what is.
  • Feel all your feelings. Give yourself permission to to feel everything that you feel.
  • Feel empowered by realizing you have choices in how you handle things. You don’t have to DO anything. Chose how you want to do it and know you are making a choice instead of being forced into something.
  • Get support, reach out, connect with other people, share your story. Don’t live this by yourself because there are so many people living it. That’s what we’re here for, to support each other.
  • Find the blessing and remember that this is happening for me, not to me. With that perspective, what can I do with it, what does it mean? What do I want to make this mean for myself or my child? How can this be a blessing for my family?

Please contact me if you want to know more about my daughter’s journey with eczema. I didn’t want to go too much into my own story, but I hope what I’ve shared has given you some take-aways. I would love to hear from you! I wish you well and your little ones well or whoever is struggling with eczema. I know it’s hard, but I also know there are ways to deal with it and a lot of it has to do with self care. So I hope that you find that for yourself.

 

Bio: Marieke Bosch Larose is a certified Martha Beck Life Coach and founder of Your Novel LifeShe helps curious women see what happens when they slow down enough to know who they are, so they can take charge of themselves and the lives they create.  Ready to slow down & enjoy your life more? Click here for your FREE GUIDEBOOK!

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The Best Mittens and Gloves for Eczema on the Hands

Another great post from itchylittleworld.com – Natural remedies for eczema to soothe your itchy little world..

By Laura Dolgy (bio below)

Eczema on the hands is a pain to deal with, especially since we use our hands for almost everything! If you or your little one is suffering from intense itching and dry skin on their/your hands, then you’ll want to check out this week’s post that discusses everything you need to know about mittens and gloves for eczema to protect and heal the hands!

Please keep in mind that although these treatments can relieve eczema, we are in no way medical professionals. If you’re experiencing severe eczema symptoms like fever or an infection, it is best to seek medical advice immediately.

Why Wear Gloves for Eczema?

With eczema on hands, your dry, sensitive skin is constantly being exposed to drying soap, chemicals, you name it! So, the first step to healing your hands is to protect them as often as you can, night and day. We recommend wearing gloves to protect the skin from the elements, your daily tasks and from scratching. Protection from these irritants will help your skin begin to heal and when combined with a good moisturizer, you’ll really see results much faster. For best results during a flare up, apply a good moisturizer (this one is our favorite!) and then cover with the gloves overnight. Remove the gloves in the morning, apply moisturizer again and wear the gloves overtop during the day. You should start to see healing at the end of the first 24-48 hours. Wearing gloves also means you can forgo using soap, which can be so drying. So, skip the soap, wear your gloves and give your hands the relief they deserve!

When shopping for gloves for eczema, we recommend you look for the following qualities:

  • Thin, breathable, natural material. The last thing you need is for sweat to further aggravate your eczema. Bamboo and cotton are great fabrics for gloves, as is TENCL fabric. Read more: Why Natural Fibers Are Essential for Eczema Clothing.
  • Stretchy fabric. Your gloves will last longer and maintain a nice fitted shape if they contain elastaine or latex. But if you have a latex allergy, beware of all stretchy fabric and look for latex-free elastaine.

The following are some great gloves for eczema to protect and heal your hands.

Eczema Gloves for Kids and Toddlers

These gloves are extremely soft and made from bamboo and Lycra, which means they are lightweight, cooling and stretchy. Not only can they help prevent children from scratching their eczema or psoriasis, but they can also double up as a dry or wet wrap garment by applying a natural eczema treatment (read all about wet/dry wrapping below!). The gloves are also tailored fit and don’t stretch like typical cotton gloves.

Aside from eczema, these gloves are also perfect for children who suffer from allergic contact dermatitis and dermatomyositis.

gloves for eczema

Eczema Gloves for Adults

If you’re still suffering from eczema on the hands, then you’ll want to check out these gloves for eczema that are great at preventing scratching, but also provide protection for contact dermatitis, psoriasis and much more.

Similar to the children gloves mentioned above, they are made from bamboo and stretchy latex, which means they are also lightweight, cooling and won’t stretch out.

gloves for eczema

Why Eczema Mittens?

If your little one cannot stop scratching due to eczema on hands, then it might be worth checking out eczema mittens as well.

Eczema mittens are mostly used as a protective layer for children who cannot stop scratching their irritated, itchy skin. By protecting the irritated skin, their eczema has a chance to properly heal and infection can be avoided.

When shopping for eczema mittens, we recommend you look for the following qualities:

  • Thin, breathable natural material. Like with gloves, avoid sweat and keep to natural fibers that are gentle and cooling like cotton and bamboo.
  • Openable mittens. With babies and children, it’s very important not to keep their hands covered for long periods of time during the day so they can develop their fine motor skills. To combat this issue, some mittens can be worn all day and night and folded open for play and folded closed when the child is itchy or for sleep.
  • Closure system. If you have a little Houdini that just loves to remove their mittens, look for a Velcro or tie closure or another way to keep the mittens on to the skin can heal.

Here are some great options for eczema mittens for babies to children:

ScratchMeNot Mittens

These mittens are probably one of the top tools in properly treating hand eczema, especially for little ones. They are usually worn over clothing or as long sleeves under clothing and cannot fall off or be removed by your child. By leaving the mittens in place, your little one will not be able to scratch their skin to the point of infection.

These ScratchMeNot Original Flip Mitten Sleeves offer an outer silk mitten layer, which provides comfort and less friction against your little one’s skin. The bamboo material also provides a cooling sensation, which makes it perfect for use in both warm and cool weather. The ScratchMeNot Cotton Flip Mittens are also a great mitten for little ones who are sensitive to materials such as lycra and latex.

These mittens are also extremely beneficial for any child that is suffering from chicken pox, poison ivy, post-surgery stitches and more.

gloves for eczema  gloves for eczema

Goumi Mitts

For little, little ones these mitts will stay-put, protect and prevent scratching. The bamboo and organic cotton blend allows for a breathable, cooling system and also blocks 99.7% of UVA/UVB light. The mittens are also naturally antimicrobial and include a two-part closure system with both velcro and elastic.

gloves for eczema

Other Ways to Heal Hand Eczema

Although both eczema gloves and mittens can help heal hand eczema, there are several other key ways you can control hand eczema. Here are a few ideas to get you started:

  • Limit Soap Exposure
  • Avoid Contact Irritants/Allergies
  • Try an Elimination Diet
  • Wet and Dry Wrap the Skin

To get more detailed help for your hands, check out: 5 “Handy” Ways to Keep Hand Eczema Under Control

Although treating the eczema on your hands with the suggestions above can offer much relief, it’s always important to know which underlying issue is causing the flare-up. By knowing what causes your eczema, you can be better prepared and eventually heal your hand eczema all together!

Have you found success with any mittens or gloves for eczema? Let us know in the comments below!

Bio: Laura is a contributor and content developer for It’s An Itchy Little World. She is in no way a medical professional. Her comments, suggestions, and reflections are not intended to replace any medical advice. Always seek the help of a medical professional before undertaking any diet or lifestyle changes. Please see It’s An Itchy Little World’s disclaimer for information about affiliate links and more.

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The Ultimate Winter Eczema Care Guide

Another great post from itchylittleworld.com – Natural remedies for eczema to soothe your itchy little world..

By Laura Dolgy (bio below)

Ah, yes the most anticipated season of the year has begun – winter (said no one with dry skin ever). Unfortunately for many eczema sufferers, this is the time for severely cracked, itchy and of course – dry skin. But don’t fear! Winter eczema can actually be quite easy to control, as long as you are taking proper care of both your skin and your body.

Please keep in mind that although these recommendations can relieve eczema, we are in no way medical professionals. If you’re experiencing severe eczema symptoms like fever or an infection, it is best to seek medical advice immediately.

Moisturize

It shouldn’t be a surprise that moisturizing during the winter months is extremely important. Moisturizing properly will keep skin protected from the ongoing harsh weather and will even keep itching to a minimum.

Not sure what treatment to use to properly moisturize this season and reduce winter eczema? Check out our recommendations below based on different skin types!

Itchy/Dry Eczema

This is probably the most common type of eczema found both during and outside of the winter months. If you’re experiencing itchy, dry eczema, then the best solution is to use a natural product that can actually permeate the skin and offer relief.

The Organic Manuka Skin Soothing Cream offers a perfect combination of both nourishing Manuka honey, as well as Manuka oil to soothe and calm irritated, dry and itchy skin. Another favorite is the Emily Skin Soothers for Itchy Eczema, which is filled with a selection of Chinese herbs and beeswax that soothes ALL dry skin conditions and really helps with itchy eczema.

Thick/Scaly Eczema

Tis’ the season for not only thick, dry skin, but also the dreaded “crocodile” skin. If you’re prone to suffering from really thick and scaly eczema then make sure to check out EczeHerbal #3 Dry Eczema Treatment for Adults. This treatment is specially formulated with Chinese herbs to treat and offer relief to dry and scaly eczema.

Got itchy and scaly eczema? Try this Grass Fed Tallow Balm that will immediately soothe dry skin and provide natural relief for your itchy skin. Not only is this balm extremely nourishing and thick, but it comes in three variations: unscented, with lavender and with lavender and tea tree. So you can choose how much herbal power you’d like. For the most sensitive of skin, the unscented would be best. And for full antibacterial and antiseptic properties, go for the lavender and tea tree variation.

Red/Weeping Eczema

If your weeping eczema only gets worse in the winter then this Emily Skin Soothers for Red Eczema Rashes is a great option. It was created by an acupuncturist as a natural alternative for healing weeping and crusty eczema. Not only does it calm the red, but it will help treat topical bacteria, yeast and fungus.

Another great natural treatment is EczeHerbal #1 Oozing Eczema Treatment that contains a mixture of Chinese herbs perfect for relieving itchy and crusty eczema. A little goes a long way, so don’t let the small jars worry you.

Wet/Dry Wrapping

Because skin is highly sensitive in the winter months and has the tendency to become dry, itchy and scaly, we definitely recommend wet and dry wrapping. This process only requires a bath, moisturizer and a layer of clothing to seal in moisture. We guarantee that dry, winter eczema will feel much better after trying this! Read more about wet wrap therapy here.

Vitamin D

With winter months comes less sunshine and that means less Vitamin D. As discussed in our blog post The Truth about Vitamin D and Eczema, studies have shown that the consumption of vitamin D has been effective in treating and healing eczema. In fact, without enough vitamin D, your immune system can weaken which can cause the skin barrier to break down and the chances for skin infection to increase.

By supplementing with tablets such as these Viva Naturals High Potency Vitamin D3 or by increasing your intake of fatty fish and fish oils, you can decrease your chance of skin infection and even provide some much needed relief to your dry skin.

Eat Properly

Aside from keeping skin moisturized all season long, it’s very important to also heal yourself from within. As we have mentioned in many other posts, carrying out an elimination diet can help you discover what is triggering your dry, itchy eczema. Yes, winter is making your eczema worse, but your body is likely already inflamed, so reducing inflammation by way of diet can really help your skin! To learn more about elimination diets and if they work, make sure to check out: Our Eczema Elimination Diet Success (How You Can Do It Too!).

You can also heal eczema by focusing on certain foods during the winter months like root vegetables and warming, nourishing foods like bone broth that can help keep your gut balanced. To get a better idea of what foods are beneficial for winter eczema, take a look at our blog post: How to Eat Well For Winter Eczema Relief that is packed with suggestions and recommendations from Naturopath Dr. Amy Duong.

Although the winter months might be the harshest time for eczema, there are many treatments and practices one can adopt to keep their skin safe. The above tips might help keep your eczema hydrated at the surface, but eating healthy and knowing which allergens to stay away from will also help wonders.

How do you deal with winter eczema? Let us know in the comments below!

Bio: Laura is a contributor and content developer for It’s An Itchy Little World. She is in no way a medical professional. Her comments, suggestions, and reflections are not intended to replace any medical advice. Always seek the help of a medical professional before undertaking any diet or lifestyle changes. Please see It’s An Itchy Little World’s disclaimer for information about affiliate links and more.

The Ultimate Winter Eczema Care Guide appeared first on itchylittleworld.com. Come read more about natural remedies for eczema!

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One Woman’s Incredible Story of a Chronic Allergic Reaction to Latex

Another great post from itchylittleworld.com – Natural remedies for eczema to soothe your itchy little world..

Last week, we received a truly incredible story from Renee, a long-time sufferer of eczema with a chronic allergic reaction to latex. She thought she had been avoiding latex for years, but discovered she’d unknowingly been exposing her body to latex in two hidden ways. Her story is quite shocking! See for yourself.

“I’m 60 years old.  When I worked in an OB/GYN lab in my 20s, there were no nitrile gloves, only rubber.  I became allergic to latex and so learned to stay away from rubber products, even supposedly latex-free elastics, and bromeliads (cross reactive with latex).  In my early 40s I began to have joint pain and skin rashes.  The joint pain was so bad. There were nights where I had to stop on the way to the restroom and just breathe, to try to let the pain ease a bit, before continuing on.  Eventually, my breathing became an issue as well and I was diagnosed with Reactive Airway Disease and exercise-induced asthma.  The joint pains were never definitively diagnosed and I went on the usual merry-go-round of diagnoses, e.g. lupus, fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis, etc.  But then suddenly, in my early 50s, the problems disappeared.  The joint pain left, the breathing was no longer a problem, and my skin improved.  I didn’t understand why, but I was so grateful.

Latex Allergy4

In my late 50s, my husband was diagnosed with a brain tumor. 2016 was full of stress and sadness. My skin problems returned with a vengeance and I found I could not eat many foods that were rich in hevein and its cousins.  Hevein is the protein responsible for latex allergy.  If I ate coconut, palm oil, nuts, etc, the eczema patches flared and oozed.  The itching was non-stop, in spite of a daily regimen of antihistamines.  It was torture.  Everyone said “Stress!” and I thought it was as well, until the symptoms got even worse after my husband passed.  I was only able to eat 17 things and realized I had graduated to a full latex food allergy.  Any other food made my eczema and itching flare.  There were patches of infected skin all over my body.

A few weeks after the funeral, I had a molar pulled.  The oral surgeon showed it to me, saying yes, there had been a hairline fracture just like a previous molar he had pulled when I was in my 50s.  The tooth that he showed me had pink stuff in the root canals and I asked what it was.  He said, “Oh, it’s a resin from a tree called gutta percha.  It’s used to fill in the empty canals after the tooth’s roots are removed in a root canal job.”  I looked at that gummy resin and asked if it might be related to the rubber tree?  The oral surgeon suddenly looked really shaken and went to his computer.  Sure enough, gutta percha is related to the rubber tree.  I was being poisoned by my own tooth?  Incredible.

So looking back, my first autoimmunity started after my first root canal and resolved after the tooth was pulled, and now my second bout of autoimmunity started after the second root canal and would resolve just as quickly?  Sure enough, by that evening my inflamed skin and itching were about 1/2 of what they had been.  But even so, my eczema did not fully resolve and I was not able to add any foods back.  I thought okay there must be something else inside of me that is overstimulating my immune system.  The more I thought about it, the more I suspected a trans-urethral mesh, the “Sparc sling” that had been put in during my hysterectomy in 2004.  It’s the one you see on late-night TV, with lawyers asking if you’d like to join a class-action lawsuit against the manufacturers.  I had also suffered some of the symptoms they said on TV but it was the suspected autoimmunity that bothered me the most.

So on October 9th of this year, during abdominal surgery, the surgeon removed the mesh.  She was able to get it out totally, fortunately.  The rest of my skin began to clear on the operating table – seriously. The head OR nurse had been watching the eczema patches on my arm and chest because of the fear of my reactivity to their tapes, adhesives, etc.  Those things, especially the “inert ingredients” are all partially sourced from coconut and palm oils, and they were concerned of anaphylaxis.  Since I had told them that the patches would flare bright red if I were reacting to something, they were using those patches as their ‘canary in the mine shaft’.  After they wheeled me into PACU and I came out of anesthesia, the head nurse said, “Mrs. McMurray, look at your arm!”  It was totally clear.

Latex Allergy

The next day, a hospital official came to my room and asked to see the arm and my chest.  Both were totally clear.  Then the surgeon sent her Nurse Practitioner the day after that – it was still clear.  Everyone said the same thing – that in all of their years of working on patients, they had never seen an allergic reaction, especially something as tenacious as eczema, clear so quickly.

I am home now, three weeks later, and am a little bit red.  No eczema, but just a tinge of redness and a small amount of itching.  This is due to the corset I must wear.  Try as I might, I can’t stop the elastic bits from touching my skin.  But let’s put this in perspective – when that mesh and gutta percha were in my body, elastic sent me into absolute misery.  My skin would become red and weepy.  The sores itched like crazy, usually for 24 hours per day.  At night I’d wake up in respiratory distress because the swelling would reach my neck.  I slept with a rescue kit.  A little bit of redness and mild itching is nothing.  I am so, so happy.  I have to wear this corset for two more weeks and then I can take it off for good.  Then, after a few months, maybe I will start to experiment with slowly adding foods back.

Latex Allergy 3

I feel like I have a future now.  Frankly, when I was in the middle of the misery, I could not see me lasting 30 more years like that.  I did not want to live with that misery. Life is good. There is hope.”

Today, Renee’s skin is clear and healthy. She’s working every day to introduce foods back into her diet, but still experiences hives here and there from negative reactions. Although a nuisance, as she states, they are in no way as intolerable as her chronic eczema was. She also does not need to take as many antihistamines as she used to. By sharing her story, Renee hopes that she can help someone else suffering from a latex allergy.

 

For ideas to soothe your skin, start here for eczema relief!

 

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