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7 DIY Home Remedies for Eczema

Another great post from itchylittleworld.com – Natural remedies for eczema to soothe your itchy little world..

By Laura Dolgy (bio below)

Does this sound like a familiar story? You’re at home, enjoying dinner when all of a sudden you start to notice an eczema flareup beginning on your neck. It’s Friday night and although you can wait until Monday to search for an eczema treatment, you need something you can find relatively quickly to stop the itch.

If you’ve ever been in this situation – you’ve come to the right place! This week, we’re sharing various DIY home remedies for eczema that are both natural and can be made with simple ingredients you can find at your local health or grocery store. No need to wait until Monday to get relief!

Please keep in mind I am in no way a medical professional. If you’re experiencing severe eczema or have a topical infection, it is always best to seek medical advice immediately.

1) Extra Virgin Coconut Oil

If you have mild eczema, applying a light layer of virgin coconut oil twice a day can heal the affected skin. In severe cases, you may have to apply a thick coat of this oil and wrap it with a wet bandage, so that it has the chance to permeate the skin. Read more about wet wrap therapy here.

Extra virgin coconut oil has also been proven successful in eliminating eczema scars, stretch marks and keratosis pilaris. It can also double up as a cooking ingredient!

2) Honey

Honey, particularly Manuka Honey, is good to use if you want to reduce eczema flare-ups and scars. It has anti-inflammatory properties that can help facilitate wound healing.  After washing the affected area, apply honey directly on your skin. Cover with a bandage if using straight honey as it can be sticky and messy. And don’t try this for children under two years of age due to the risk of botulism.

If you have sensitive skin and need extra exfoliation, you can mix it with sugar and gently scrub your skin with the mixture for a few minutes. However, you should be careful if you’re experiencing a severe flare-up. Scrubbing already sensitive, cracked and perhaps oozing skin is not always the best idea.

If you want all the benefits of honey, but not the sticky mess it can make, try this Organic Manuka Skin Soothing Cream, which contains olive oil, manuka honey and manuka oil. It’s known for healing eczema wounds, reducing the appearance of eczema scars, while helping soothe and provide anti-inflammatory effects to flared skin.

3) Magnesium Bath

This recipe comes straight from Wellness Mama and it’s the perfect skin healing mixture for those with eczema that can stand bathing. These types of baths are great, as they are a relatively cost effective and an easy way to help find eczema relief.

Ingredients

Directions

Add to bath and relax!

For more suggestions on how to heal eczema naturally, check out Wellness Mama’s many other tips here!

4) Face Eczema Serum

If you’re experiencing face eczema and need quick relief, coconut oil or honey can work really well. But if you’re looking to try something really light, but still moisturizing, this DIY face eczema serum from Mommypotamus is a great alternative to chemically ridden face serums on the market.

Ingredients

Directions

Add rosehip seed oil and essential oil drops to a serum container or mini spray bottle. Shake to mix all ingredients together. You can spray this along your face or neck before bed and in the morning as well.

This DIY serum is great for those suffering from eczema because rosehip seed oil promotes collagen and supports scar healing. Not to mention that it soothes eczema and psoriasis. For more information on this serum and other Mommypotamus eczema home remedies, check out her blog!

If you’re suffering from facial eczema and do not have the time to buy your own ingredients, both Organic Aloe Vera Skin Soothing Spray and Calendula Facial Cream are great alternatives. The soothing spray is a non-greasy, vegan formula that contains both aloe and calendula for quick healing. It can also be popped into the refrigerator for a cool and soothing treat. On the other hand, the facial cream contains Rooibos leaf that is anti-inflammatory, which helps reduce allergic responses and histamine release.

5) Homemade Face or Baby Wipes

If you’ve ever taken a look at the ingredients in wipes, you probably noticed that there are many preservatives and synthetic cleaners – not mention the baby wipes we have in North America are banned in Europe due to their chemical ingredients. Yikes! To whip yourself up a bulk of natural wipes is quite cost effective and very easy!

This recipe was sent to us and is a great alternative that can be customized based on specific allergies or skin types. Also perfect for eczema skin – it won’t burn!

Ingredients & Supplies

Directions

Just whisk the water, baby wash and oil/lotion together.  Add a few drops of tea tree oil too to give it some antibacterial & antiseptic properties.

If using paper towels as wipes:

  • Place the mixture into an old baby wipes container or a container like this one.
  • Put the paper towels, cut side down, into the mixture.
  • Once the paper has absorbed the material, you’ll be able to take out the cardboard core.
  • Pull the paper through the container and voila! Natural baby wipes!

If using reusable wash clothes:

  • Simply add the mixture to a spray bottle and spray onto a wash cloth.

6) Sea Salt Spray

Another one of our favorite home remedies for eczema from the Wellness Mama has to be this Sea Salt Spray that leaves skin feeling refreshed.

Ingredients

1 cup of distilled or boiled water

1 tbsp Himalayan salt (or Sea Salt)

Pinch of epsom salts or magnesium flakes 

Optional: add one of these essential oils for eczema

Directions

Add all ingredients in a cup and stir until salt is dissolved. Add to a spray bottle or glass jar for long term use. Can be used as part of your daily regimen by either directly spraying onto skin or adding with cotton pad.

If you’re suffering from dry or cracked skin, you can also calendula or chamomile tea!

7) Homemade Lotion Bars

Looking for an inexpensive dry skin lotion bar? Check out this awesome home remedy for eczema from Little House Living which is perfect for those suffering from dry skin.

Ingredients

Directions

  • Melt all ingredients in a saucepan over medium heat.
  • Place a piece of parchment paper on the surface area you’ll be working on
  • Pour the soap into the empty deodorant containers
  • Let the lotion harden and store in your bathroom, fridge or somewhere cool
  • Scrap the hardened drips off the parchment paper to use for the next batch!

For more suggestions on how to heal eczema naturally, check out Little House Living’s many other tips here!

Looking for other DIY home remedies for eczema or other skin conditions? Check out these other blog posts:

10 Natural Remedies for Eczema You Can Try at Home Today

13 Home Remedies for Eczema Scars

5 DIY Natural Remedies for Rosacea

If you’re low on time or need something relatively easy and cost effective, check out The Eczema Company’s natural eczema treatments – they are sure to bring you much needed relief.

Got any DIY home remedies for eczema of your own? Share them with us below in the comments!

Bio: Laura is a contributor and content developer for It’s An Itchy Little World. She is in no way a medical professional. Her comments, suggestions, and reflections are not intended to replace any medical advice. Always seek the help of a medical professional before undertaking any diet or lifestyle changes. Please see It’s An Itchy Little World’s disclaimer for information about affiliate links and more.

7 DIY Home Remedies for Eczema appeared first on itchylittleworld.com. Come read more about natural remedies for eczema!

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13 Skincare Ingredients & Eczema Irritants You NEED to Avoid Right Now

Another great post from itchylittleworld.com – Natural remedies for eczema to soothe your itchy little world..

If you’re suffering from any skin condition, we’re sure you’ve tried countless treatments to provide some type of relief. However, you should know that there are many skincare ingredients that can make skin conditions like acne and rosacea even worse. And we know they are very often eczema irritants, so they are very important to highlight.

This week, we take a look at the top 13 skincare ingredients you should avoid in your daily regimen – this is most important for anyone with a skin condition, but its good advice for healthy skin too.

All skincare we recommend on this blog ALWAYS avoids the following 13 chemicals.

Please keep in mind I am in no way a medical professional. If you’re experiencing severe eczema or have a topical infection, it is always best to seek medical advice immediately.

Which Skincare Ingredients to Avoid

Triclosan

This active ingredient can be found in literally any type of anti-bacterial product such as deodorants, cleansers, and hand sanitizers. There have been studies that show that this ingredient can pass through skin and interfere with hormone function.

Not only is it practically poison for our bodies, but it’s also extremely toxic to the environment [1].

Parabens

You’ve probably heard this label thrown around a lot lately. Parabens are a class of preservatives that are included in cosmetics and pharmaceutical products. Not many people know how to recognize them in products due to the list of names they go by such as methylparaben, ethylparaben, n-propylparaben and many others that for the most part all end in “paraben.”

You can mostly find Parabens in moisturizer, lipstick, foundation, concealer, eye makeup and makeup removers.

Phthalates

Similar to parabens, there is a very long list of names these chemicals go by. Essentially they are used in plastics, but are also used in personal care products to make fragrances last longer.

Fragrance or Perfume or Parfum

Really, unless it says essential oil, you’re looking at an artificial and chemical additive. They are always seen in products that have a scent. This is a very common eczema irritant and should ALWAYS be avoided when you’re dealing with dermatitis.

Siloxanes

These silicone-based compounds are seen often in cosmetics to soften, smooth and moisten skin. They also make hair products dry quickly and deodorant creams slide on more easily. You easily find them in shampoos, and body or facial creams.

Similar to Triclosan, these compounds have been shows to be toxic for humans, as well as the environment. In fact it can possibly impair human fertility [1].

PEGS

These chemicals are actually petroleum-based and are widely used in cosmetics as thickeners, softeners and moisture-carriers. Interestingly enough, they are also used in pharmaceutical laxatives.

Although all these skincare ingredients should be avoided, it looks like PEGS are actually unsafe for damaged skin. It can actually cause irritation and systemic toxicity [2].

PEGS commonly go by the name Oxynol, Ammonium laureth sulfate, as well as all ingredients that have “eth” in the name.

Oxybenzone

This is the #1 chemical that is used in sunscreens. It actually is probably one of the most toxic ingredients in skin care products and according to The Environmental Working Group it is what skin allergies react to most [3].

To avoid this one, chose a zinc based sunblock instead of a sunscreen. Read more about that in our Summer Eczema Care Guide.

Diethanolamine, Monoethanolamine, Triethanolamine (DEAs)

Most products that are either creamy or sudsy like soaps, cleaners, and shampoos will contain these harmful ingredients.

Ever wondered how your eyes get irritated by shampoo or certain soaps, often times its due to DEAs! The European Union has actually classified DEA as harmful and can cause serious damage to one’s health from prolonged exposure [1].

P-Phenylenediamine (PPD)

This chemical is often found in hair dyes. In fact, it’s very difficult to find conventional hair dyes that don’t contain this ingredient. This chemical can cause allergic reactions to those with already sensitive skin or with skin conditions.

But how bad is it for you? Well let’s put it this way. It’s used in rubber chemicals, and textile dyes and pigments. Gross!

DMDM Formaldehyde

This ingredient is used extensively in a wide range of cosmetics such as nail polish, hair products, deodorants and so much more.

If you didn’t already know, formaldehyde is already classified as a human carcinogen that can cause cancer. And it’s an embalming fluid, need I say more?

Butylated Hydroxyanisole (BHA) and Butylated Hdroxytoluene (BHT)

These chemicals are synthetic antioxidants that are used in preservatives for lipsticks, moisturizers and many other cosmetics. They are actually used in food as well.

Similarly to other harmful ingredients listed, it mimics estrogen and creates hormonal disruptors.

Citronella

This substance is also known as methyleugenol.

Studies have shown that when this substance has been administered internally to mice, it has cause tumors to appear in multiple sites. In fact, it is so toxic, Health Canada has made sure to ban it from cosmetics.

Petrolatum

You already know what petroleum jelly is! It’s been used by many over the years as a barrier to lock in moisture, as well as added to hair products to make hair shine.

However, this substance can actually be contaminated with another chemical know as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Exposure to both these harmful chemicals combined is associated with cancer. The European Union actually classifies petrolatum as a carcinogen and restricts its use in cosmetics [1].

So…What Now? 

If you’re feeling somewhat depressed after reading this article or thinking you might have to clean out your entire cosmetic cabinet, don’t fear. It’s extremely difficult to avoid all these chemicals in our daily lives, but small steps are always better than none at all!

You can start by just replacing one thing like a moisturizer. And don’t believe the hype – you can use a good natural moisturizer on every part of your body, even your face and around the eyes. A balm like Organic Manuka Skin Soothing Cream would be our suggestion for all over moisture.

If you’re ready to find a good source for non-toxic, chemical free, gentle skincare, free of eczema irritants, then we recommend The Eczema Company where you can find natural treatments for eczema as well as eczema clothing.

Do you try to avoid these skincare ingredients and eczema irritants?

How did you first learn about these chemicals?

How did you transition to all natural products?

Let us know in the comments below!

Bio: Laura Dolgy is a contributor and content developer for It’s An Itchy Little World. She is in no way a medical professional. Her comments, suggestions, and reflections are not intended to replace any medical advice. Always seek the help of a medical professional before undertaking any diet or lifestyle changes. Please see It’s An Itchy Little World’s disclaimer for information about affiliate links and more.

Sources

  1. European Commission. Regulation (EC) 1272/2008 , Annex VI, Table 3.2. Sep 2009. http://ecb.jrc.ec.europa.eu/classification-labelling
  2. Lanigan, RS (CIR Expert Panel). “Final report on the safety assessment of PPG-11 and PPG-15 stearyl ethers.” Int J Toxicol.20 Suppl 4 (2001):13-26
  3. The Trouble with Ingredients in Sunscreens. The Environmental Working Group. https://www.ewg.org/sunscreen/report/the-trouble-with-sunscreen-chemicals/#.WfvHVBNSxTY

13 Skincare Ingredients & Eczema Irritants You NEED to Avoid Right Now appeared first on itchylittleworld.com. Come read more about natural remedies for eczema!

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The Truth about Vitamin D and Eczema

Another great post from itchylittleworld.com – Natural remedies for eczema to soothe your itchy little world..

Have you ever wondered how important Vitamin D can be for eczema? This week, we take a look at a variety of studies that examine vitamin D and eczema. We’ll also discuss how much of it you may need in order to heal eczema properly and effectively.

Please keep in mind that although these tips and information have worked for several eczema sufferers, I am in no way a medical professional. If you’re experiencing severe eczema or have a topical infection, it is always best to seek medical advice immediately.

If you are not producing enough vitamin D, your immune system can weaken which can cause the skin barrier to break down and the chances for skin infection to increase. It is no wonder why many eczema sufferers’ skin gets worse in the winter. In addition to the dry air created by indoor heaters, it’s possible they’re not getting enough vitamin D.

ILW Recommends: Does your Child’s Eczema Get Worse in the Winter?

For a while now, a common treatment for severe eczema (especially during the winter months) has been to expose skin to ultraviolet light, which essentially stimulates the production of vitamin D in the skin.

However, recently the consumption of vitamin D has shown to be just as effective in treating and healing eczema. In fact, several studies have been conducted to determine the levels of vitamin D present in the skin of those with eczema, as well as the effects of vitamin D in treating eczema.

Studies with Vitamin D and Eczema

Randomized controlled trial using vitamins E and D supplementation in atopic dermatitis

In 2011, a study [1] was conducted to assess the effects of vitamins D and E supplementation in eczema patients. 45 eczema patients were included in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled experiment where each were treated for 60 days. Separate vitamin D groups and vitamin E groups each saw an improvement in the intensity and amount of eczema around 35%. But together, when 1600 IU of vitamin D3 and 600 IU of vitamin E were given together, patients improved by 64%!!

The study revealed that there were notable effects and benefits in supplementing vitamin D for eczema patients and even more so when given together with vitamin E.

Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis) treated by 1600 IU of vitamin D

In December 2016 a systematic review [2] was conducted in order to compile results from various past studies on vitamin D and eczema.

They looked at four randomized controlled trials, including the one mentioned just above, and they were able to discover that serum vitamin D levels were generally lower in eczema patients, but especially so in children. And all studies they reviewed indicated that vitamin D helped to improve a patient’s eczema overall.

But How Much Vitamin D Should You Take?

Although many studies have shown that vitamin D can be beneficial in the treatment of eczema, another question might be: how much vitamin D does one need to heal safely and effectively?

Prior to supplementing vitamin D, it’s important to note that in summer conditions or hot weather, it’s possible to generate close to 20,000 units of vitamin D just from exposure to the sun. However, during the winter months, it’s difficult to generate anything close to that amount let alone the recommended dosage.

Vitamin D Dose Recommendations

Generally, 35 IUs of vitamin D per pound of body weight is the recommended average dose.

Check out the chart below for more information:

Age Dosage
Below 5 35 units per pound per day
Age 5 – 10 2500 units
Adults 4000-8000 units
Pregnant Women 5000-10000 units

Although these are general recommendations, testing your blood for vitamin D really is the only reliable way to know how much vitamin D you or your little one needs.

ALWAYS speak with your physician before starting any sort of supplementation.

Where to find Vitamin D?

  • Vitamin D is naturally found in fatty fish and fish oils, as well as small amounts in beef liver, egg yolks and cheese. Not all oils are created equal, so be sure to read about fish oil for eczema to learn about the safest oils.
  • Foods fortified with vitamin D like some dairy products, orange juice, soy milk, and cereals.
  • Sun, sun, sun…oh and, SUN!
  • As available, safe and inexpensive tablets such as these Viva Naturals High Potency Vitamin D3 Jennifer Roberge, our founder and editor, swears by liquid drops and loves this brand for her family. She adds the drops to her kid’s oatmeal and cereal or any breakfast food and it doesn’t change the taste.

Again, if you are vitamin D deficient or think you might have to supplement with higher doses, it’s always best to see your doctor before doing so.

What about probiotics? Learn more in Can Probiotics Help Eczema?

Looking for more answers to the eczema puzzle? Find out more in Jennifer’s post Natural Remedies for Eczema: What Worked For My Son.

What’s your eczema like in the winter? Do you supplement with vitamin D? We want to hear from you in the comments below!

Bio: Laura Dolgy is a contributor and content developer for It’s An Itchy Little World. She is in no way a medical professional. Her comments, suggestions, and reflections are not intended to replace any medical advice. Always seek the help of a medical professional before undertaking any diet or lifestyle changes. Please see It’s An Itchy Little World’s disclaimer for information about affiliate links and more.

Sources:

  1. Randomized controlled trial using vitamins E and D supplementation in atopic dermatitis.
  2. Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis) treated by 1600 IU of vitamin D

The Truth about Vitamin D and Eczema appeared first on itchylittleworld.com. Come read more about natural remedies for eczema!

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Why you Should Try Conqueror Eczema Balm

Another great post from itchylittleworld.com – Natural remedies for eczema to soothe your itchy little world..

Something that’s very important to us at this blog is to provide you with helpful resources and natural treatments that can bring you eczema relief. And NOTHING makes us happier than hearing when our recommendations or tips work for you!

This week, we’re sharing a review from a customer who recently purchased the Conqueror Soothing Eczema Balm.

Check out what he had to say:

“I am currently in an extreme eczema flare up and the intense itchiness is brutal.  I also work with the public, so even though I can wear long sleeves to hide the signs of eczema I still look like a goof scratching like a fiend.  When I use the Conqueror Soothing Eczema Balm, within a minute or two I have much less itchiness.  It lasts for around two or three hours and then I reapply.  This is AWESOME!!  

The eczema also caused a thickening of skin on the arms and face from my constant scratching, especially at night when I am sleeping not really aware of the scratching. So I used the EczeHerbal #3 on my face and arms and after a day the thickness went away!  My skin is starting to look better now, and of course I am addressing the situation by eating correctly as well.

I appreciate your topical products because of the natural ingredients.  The products that I would buy from the pharmacy never addressed the itchiness and there were ingredients in them that I know were not good for my system.  The medication I received from the dermatologists when I was first diagnosed years ago were simply abysmal.  They caused more flare ups and gave my skin the look of a burn victim.

My last major, whole body flare up was 2 years ago and within that time frame I also experienced smaller more localized eruptions on my neck and arms. I could address quickly by altering my diet, taking some probiotics and digestive enzyme supplements. I am grateful for your company and the products that you supply. You may have noticed that I have already placed another order!” – Chris B.

That review still has us feeling overwhelmed with gratitude! We’re thrilled Chris has seen so much improvement with the various forms of eczema he has AND we’re equally happy that he’s been able to alter his diet and see results based on that as well. We are BIG believers in eczema elimination diets and healing from within. 

Curious about the EczeHerbal #3 Chris mentions? Learn more about the full line of EczeHerbal products with Traditional Chinese Medicine HERE.

If you haven’t tried the Conqueror Soothing Eczema Balm yet, here are 4 reasons why you should try it today:

  • A 15-in-1 Natural Formula: Unlike many other products on the market today, this balm is 100% natural and contains ingredients that will soothe and moisturize inflamed skin. It contains superfood ingredients that are equally good digested and applied to the skin like aloe vera, avocado oil, rosehip seed extract, calendula oil, and much more.
  • Hypo-allergenic: If you or your little one suffer from a variety of allergies or have trouble finding products that don’t trigger a reaction, then this balm is a perfect alternative as it contains ingredients that are not known to commonly trigger reactions.

eczema balm

  • Not only for Eczema: Not only does this balm work on eczema prone skin, but it’s also a great moisturizer for dry skin, psoriasis, stretch marks or burns. The aloe vera in this balm helps repair damaged skin, while the calendula oil speeds wound healing.

eczema balm

  • Safe for all ages: The ingredients used in this balm are safe for everyone including babies, children and pregnant women!eczema balm

 

 

Have you tried the Conqueror Soothing Eczema Balm yet?

We’d love to hear what you think in the comments below!

Why you Should Try Conqueror Eczema Balm appeared first on itchylittleworld.com. Come read more about natural remedies for eczema!

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Eczema Awareness Month + A Special Giveaway!

Another great post from itchylittleworld.com – Natural remedies for eczema to soothe your itchy little world..

These past few years have been a busy time for eczema and eczema research! From studies that prove atopic dermatitis is in fact an immune-driven disease (source) to a new FDA approved drug for moderate to severe eczema. We’re finally getting to the bottom of this difficult condition – but there is still so much work to be done!

October is Eczema Awareness Month and as always, we want to support the eczema community by sharing a variety of tips and resources!

Here are some of our most popular blog posts:

And from our Educational Eczema Series:

In honor of this month, we want our community to come together and help spread the word about eczema!

Here’s how YOU can get involved! Do these 2 things right now:

  1. Forward this blog post to anyone you know that suffers from eczema.
  2. Share this blog post on social media and help spread eczema awareness.

The Eczema Care Giveaway

The Eczema Company will also be hosting an AMAZING giveaway at the end of this month – so make sure to mark it on your calendar!

On October 23rd at 10AM the Eczema Care Giveaway will be launched, where one winner will win over $ 800 in eczema care prizes. Prizes will be donated by several experts such as:

  • The Paleo Mom
  • The Eczema Company
  • Holistic Squid
  • Natural Skin Dr.
  • Prime Physique Nutrition
  • Dermveda
  • The Allergista
  • And many more!!!!

Make sure to follow The Eczema Company on Facebook for updates and news about the giveaway!

Let’s come together and kiss eczema goodbye!

Eczema Awareness Month + A Special Giveaway! appeared first on itchylittleworld.com. Come read more about natural remedies for eczema!

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Eczema 104: How to Protect & Treat Eczema Naturally

Another great post from itchylittleworld.com – Natural remedies for eczema to soothe your itchy little world..

In the previous part of this series, Eczema 103: How to Heal Eczema From Within, we discussed how to heal the body from the inside out. Now we’re going to discuss how to treat eczema naturally.

Please keep in mind that although these tips and information have worked for several sufferers, we are in no way medical professionals. If you’re experiencing severe symptoms or have a topical infection, it is always best to seek medical advice immediately.

Prevent Scratching

In many cases, the most difficult thing to tolerate about eczema is the constant itch and the desperate need to scratch. It can be all consuming! And while you may be good at not scratching during the day, you may unknowingly scratch while you sleep and open new wounds or worsen existing wounds. So, the first step to treat eczema naturally is to wear scratch protective clothing like eczema mittens and gloves.

For kids, this may mean wearing something like these ScratchMeNot Flip Mitten Sleeves. Or perhaps eczema gloves in soft bamboo. And for pajamas, there are plenty of sleep sacks and pajamas for eczema that come with attached mittens to prevent harmful scratching.

For adults, there are tops with built in mittens (trying getting out of these while you sleep!) and bamboo eczema gloves.

Treat With Natural Skincare

Since healing from within can take some time to see results, you may find you need to treat your skin topically with natural skincare to find relief in the interim. Not all products labeled as “natural” really are, so read your labels and watch out for the following ingredients which are toxic and/or common skin irritants.

Ingredients to Avoid

  • Alcohol of any type (too drying and can cause burning)
  • Fragrance/Parfumes
  • FD&C Colors and Pigments
  • Petroleum
  • Parabens
  • Phthalates
  • PEG’s
  • Propylene glycol
  • Phenoxyethanol
  • Cocamidopropyl betaine
  • Sodium benzoate
  • Dimethicone
  • SLS, SLES, ALES, ALS – all sulfates

Treat By Symptom

Because symptoms can overlap between the various types of eczema, it’s usually most effective to determine the best course of treatment based on the symptoms rather than by the type of eczema.

For Itchy/Red/Dry Eczema

Among all eczema symptoms, these seem to be the most common. Eczema can be found in patches of chronically itchy, red and dry skin. Find products formulated for itchy, red dry eczema.

For Red/Weeping Eczema

This eczema is characterized by patches of angry looking red skin that can also be crusty or can ooze or weep. Find products formulated for red, weeping eczema.

If you are suffering from Topical Steroid Withdrawal (TSW), your skin symptoms usually fall into this category. If you’re new to our blog and currently going through TSW, check out some of our posts that focus on topical steroid withdrawal.

For Thick/Scaly Eczema

Eczema that appears in patches usually ends up thickening over time, especially with lots of scratching, causing a crocodile skin type effect. Find products formulated for thick, scaly eczema.

Moisturizer & Balm

With eczema, because the skin barrier is damaged, it’s important to repair it topically with an emollient that keeps the skin moist and also offers some wound healing properties, like any of the following products which are gentle, but great for all eczema symptoms. To help prevent eczema, apply a moisturizer once a day. To treat eczema naturally, apply moisturizer at least twice a day and ALWAYS after a bath or shower or hand washing or anytime water makes contact with the skin. To get you started, here are a few of our favorite emollients:

Organic Manuka Skin Soothing Cream is one of our favorites and The Paleo Mom’s too! It combines only six simple, natural ingredients – Organic Olive Oil, Organic Beeswax, Filtered Water, Grape Seed Oil, Organic New Zealand Manuka Honey and Manuka Oil Extract – to create an extremely thick balm with a unique, nourishing creamy texture. Read more about why Manuka honey heals eczema naturally.

Tallow Balm is another really simple, gentle nourishing balm we highly recommend. It’s made with grass fed tallow, so it’s both pure and highly nutrient. Tallow is great for even the most sensitive of skin.

Conqueror Eczema Balm has a nice simple base of oils which carries a blend of very highly effective essential oils formulated for multiple eczema symptoms. You should expect to see long lasting hydration and relief with this balm.

Organic Calendula Salve is a lovely product with one very powerful ingredient, which you can guess by the product name, calendula! This powerful flower is known for wound healing, itch relief, topical pain relief and reducing inflammation to name a few. Read about Why You Should Try Calendula For Eczema Relief.

Bathing

A really important step in treating eczema is to determine how your or your child’s skin handles bathing. Some people find relief with daily baths and some find more than once a day too drying and irritating. Like everything else with eczema, bathing frequency is best determined with trial and error to find the best results for you. Another thing to remember about bathing is that it will help keep the surface of their skin clean and free of bacteria or other irritants that may have stuck to them throughout the day. However, it’s important to note that warm baths, as cool as you can stand, are ideal whereas hot baths can be detrimental to your skin and are best avoided.

Bleach baths are a common recommendation for eczema, but bleach itself is a harmful chemical and not something we promote when trying to heal the skin. Instead, check out these bleach bath alternatives you can try at home.

In terms of soap, moderation is key. Simply put, avoid soap unless you absolutely need it without a shadow of a doubt. When you can simply rinse the skin with water, this is best. However, if you are dealing with a topical infection or open wounds and sores, soap can be critical, so it’s important to find a mild, gentle soap that is fatty, moisturizing and will strip the skin of it’s natural oils as little as possible. And it must be noted that all soap will dry the skin, but some are less offensive than others, which is what you want to use. The following are our recommendations for the best eczema soaps.

Emily’s Liquid Soap Soother & Body Wash contains eczema fighting Chinese herbs in a rich fatty base. A bonus – it can be doubled up as a shampoo! Another great alternative is this nourishing Grass Fed Tallow Soap for sensitive and allergy prone skin.

Try Dry and Wet Wrapping

Although in no way a cure, wet and dry wrapping can offer a much-needed break from itching and dryness. And honestly, I’ve never seen anything provide such fast relief.

For dry wrapping, simply apply a layer of cream on the skin and following with a dry layer of clothing. The clothing helps cream permeate into the skin. Read more about dry wrapping in Our Eczema Trials: Dry Wrapping.

For wet wrap therapy, it’s a bit more of a process, but results are faster and more intense, so it’s definitely worth the extra effort. To wet wrap you’ll need to take a bath in lukewarm water (no soap!), followed by a layer of cream, followed by a damp layer of clothing, followed by a dry layer of clothing. Once again, the clothing keeps the moisture from the cream or balm locked in, which not only provides a cooling sensation, but allows the skin to heal quicker. But the difference here is the dampness of the clothing, which intensifies the moisturizing effects. It’s for this reason that we don’t recommend using any topical medication when wet wrapping without a physician’s prior approval. Read more about wet wrapping in Our Eczema Trials: Wet Wrap Therapy.

While cotton clothing can work for wet wrapping, we’ve seen better results with TENCEL fabric clothing made especially for wrapping. WrapESoothe is a line of wet wrapping garments made with TENCEL, check out their bands/sleeves for adults and children, one piece suits for babies to toddlers and children’s tops and bottoms. For more options, check out these wet wraps for eczema relief.

For Children with Eczema

Eczema in babies or children is extremely difficult to deal with, because as parents seeing our children suffer is devastating and there isn’t anything we wouldn’t do to help give them relief. The owner of this blog, Jennifer, battled her son’s eczema for years and found certain natural eczema treatments that dramatically improved his skin. She created this blog to share her story and those stories of other parents in order to help support families in their search for skin healing. Read about Jennifer’s story here.

Learn about what ended up helping Jennifer’s son heal in Natural Remedies for Eczema – What Worked For My Son.

Finding Support & Encouragement

For everyone either going through eczema themselves or as a caregiver or parents tending to a child with eczema, know that you are not alone. We encourage you to reach out to others – do not suffer in silence. The National Eczema Association has an online support group that is wonderful resource. Managing eczema can be stressful, emotional, painful and all consuming, but it doesn’t have to control your life.

ECZEMA DOES NOT DEFINE YOU.

We have some wonderful posts all about the emotional impact of eczemawe hope you’ll read them and that they will give you strength, confidence and courage as you continue on your healing journey.

That’s the end of our four part Educational Eczema Series. If you missed any of the posts in the series, check them and a bunch of other essential posts about eczema on our Start Here for Eczema Relief page.

Let us know how YOU treat eczema naturally!

Share your stories and successes with us in the comments below!

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Eczema 103: How to Heal Eczema From Within

Another great post from itchylittleworld.com – Natural remedies for eczema to soothe your itchy little world..

In the previous part of this series, Eczema 102: What Can Trigger Eczema?, we discussed common triggers and irritants for this skin condition. Now we’ll discuss natural treatments and how to heal eczema from within.

Please keep in mind that although these tips and information have worked for several sufferers, we are in no way medical professionals. If you’re experiencing severe symptoms or have a topical infection, it is always best to seek medical advice immediately.

How to Heal Eczema

Find & Eliminate Your Triggers

Once you’ve identified and removed your triggers as best as possible, you are one stop closer to healing your skin. As noted above, triggers can be anything from pet dander to pollen, from food to fabrics and almost anything in between….and usually stress is involved on some level. If you find it difficult to identify your triggers, using a health journal can provide some serious insight when referring back over the past few weeks or months’ worth of data. With any luck, you may start to see some trends appearing in flare ups as they relate to exposure to certain foods, weather, etc.

Look Inside the Body

Did you know that what you put into your body can drastically affect your skin? We believe 100% in healing from within. To truly heal from the inside out, you’ll want to first find out what foods might be causing your eczema to flare up. To know for sure, you can conduct an elimination diet that will help you weed out which foods are affecting your health. To learn more about elimination diets and if they work, make sure to check out: Our Eczema Elimination Diet Success (How You Can Do It Too!).

If after an elimination diet, you’re still experiencing eczema, it’s important to reduce the overall inflammation in your body and to heal conditions like leaky gut. To do this, you have a few options. Move to an anti-inflammatory diet (omitting any known food triggers as well) and/or supplement your diet with fish oil, probiotics and more.

There are several diets out there that can be greatly beneficial to eczema healing and it’s hard to say which one is best. Honestly, it’s a matter of trying the one that speaks most to you and your way of living. If it doesn’t provide results and you want to give another one diet shot, go for it. Just please work with a nutritionist or physician while undergoing any dietary changes, especially when children are involved.

Here are a few diets that have been beneficial for eczema:

The Eczema Cure

Auto Immune Paleo

The Eczema Diet

Gut and Psychology Diet

Whole30

Plant Based or Vegan

Gluten/Casein Free

Candida Diet

Alkaline Diet

If you are open to supplementing your diet with various vitamins and oils, it’s best to meet with a naturopath or holistic nutritionist who can fully evaluate your health and possibly offer some tests to discover what your body may be lacking. Often times the liver may not be functioning optimally and there can be many, many more issues that can be contributing to either worsening eczema or causing it to begin with. So meeting with a functional doctor or naturopath really is important to rule out other contributing health concerns. Typical supplements for eczema include, but are not limited to fish oil, probiotics, vitamin D, and immune balancers or boosters.

There is a really great online eczema coaching course created by a holistic nutritionist, Prime Physique Nutrition’s Abby Tai, to help those who need a bit of extra support and guidance find their way to eczema healing through diet and other means. Conqueror Eczema Academy is definitely worth checking out!

Stay tuned for next week’s post, Eczema 104: Protect & Treat the Skin Naturally.

 

How do YOU heal YOUR eczema from within? What’s worked for you?

Share your story and successes in the comments below!

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Eczema 102: What Can Trigger Eczema?

Another great post from itchylittleworld.com – Natural remedies for eczema to soothe your itchy little world..

In the first part of this series, Eczema 101: What Is Eczema?, we defined eczema and the variations of this skin condition. Now we’ll get into  trigger eczema and irritants.

Please keep in mind that although these tips and information have worked for several sufferers, we are in no way medical professionals. If you’re experiencing severe symptoms or have a topical infection, it is always best to seek medical advice immediately.

What Can Trigger Eczema?

One thing about eczema is certain – there is no shortage of eczema triggers. And to make things really complex, the triggers vary from person to person making it quite difficult to identify at times. Here is a list of what can trigger eczema.

  • Airborne allergens: Anything in the environment such as dander from pets, pollen, dust and grass, can cause an eczema flare-up or exacerbate the situation. Often times HEPA air purifiers can help provide relief in cases like these, especially when asthma or sinus issues are a concern as well.
  • Food allergies or sensitivities: Many types of food have been known to trigger eczema and some commonly further inflame existing cases of eczema. Foods such as dairy, eggs and gluten are frequently linked with triggering eczema. And foods like tomatoes and other acidic foods often can cause existing eczema to flare up even worse! And you don’t have to have a proper IgE food allergy for the food to trigger eczema. The more complex, less understood and harder to diagnosis food sensitivity can trigger eczema just the same. So, while food allergy testing can be helpful in some cases, testing alone is usually NOT enough. It is very helpful to undergo an elimination diet to fully understand which foods not only trigger your eczema to begin with, but which foods may also aggravate existing eczema. Always work with a dietician, nutritionist or physician when undergoing an elimination diet to make sure you or your child is still getting a healthy-well balanced diet full of essential nutrients.
  • Fabric & Chemical Irritants: Many ingredients, fabrics or chemicals can cause eczema or exacerbate it when the skin comes in contact with them. Since anyone can be allergic to almost anything, the list of possible irritants is almost endless, but there are a few things that tend to more frequently irritate the skin than others. Nickel allergies are on the rise as is an allergy to propylene glycol, an ingredient often found in conventional skin care products. In terms of fabrics, it’s pretty common these days to react to latex and polyester and even nylon, which is referred to as textile dermatitis. Another big irritant is laundry detergent. Not only are there very harsh chemical ingredients used in detergents, but detergents, even natural ones, are very alkaline and really can irritate the skin which requires a slightly acidic environment to be optimally healthy. If you experience contact dermatitis, it’s important to read labels and make sure there are no added chemical based ingredients that can affect your skin. Our suggestion is to rely on natural eczema treatments that do not use harsh chemicals or preservatives.
  • Stress: This is quite possibly one of the most common triggers. Why? Because stress effects every one of every age and it can be very difficult to control. In fact, ironically enough, the more you try to control stress, the more stressed you can become. Mindfulness, yoga, and meditation can be great ways to relieve stress and are very healthy practices to introduce for overall better health and happiness. We have a great post about how to help children reduce stress levels HERE.
  • Medication: This trigger is not one that is commonly addressed, but many medications, both oral and topical can trigger eczema in individuals. Oral antibiotics, steroids, birth control and many more medications can strip the gut of healthy bacteria, which in turn can manifest in eczema. Read more about how antibiotics negatively impact our gut’s microbiome HERE. Definitely speak with your physician if you are concerned about any medication you are taking and how it can trigger your eczema.

For more information on what triggers eczema, make sure to check out this post with video from dermatologist Dr. Peter Lio: What Triggers Eczema?

Stay tuned for next week’s post, Eczema 103: Heal Eczema From Within!

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Eczema 101: What Is Eczema?

Another great post from itchylittleworld.com – Natural remedies for eczema to soothe your itchy little world..

So, you’ve come to the conclusion that you’re most probably suffering from eczema or you officially have a diagnosis from a physician. As difficult or painful as it may sometimes be, it’s important to remember that you are not alone. Eczema affects 10-20% of the population and chances are many in your circle of family and friends suffers with this often itchy and uncomfortable skin condition.

We want to be able to help you with all your eczema concerns or questions. If you are new to eczema, or even if you’re a seasoned pro who has read and tried it all, this Educational Eczema Series 101-104 is a must read. Make sure to click through the other posts in the series which together discuss the various types of eczema, as well as causes and natural treatments that are definitely worth trying out.

Please keep in mind that although these tips and information have worked for several sufferers, we are in no way medical professionals. If you’re experiencing severe symptoms or have a topical infection, it is always best to seek medical advice immediately.

Prior to discussing the types of eczema that exist, it’s important to actually understand what eczema is.

What Is Eczema?

Although researchers still do not know what is eczema, studies have finally proven eczema is an autoimmune disease (1), similar to psoriasis, lupus and many other immune disorders. Eczema has also been linked to an overactive response by the body’s immune system to an irritant which can create a leaky skin barrier. With leaky skin, staph, viruses, allergens, etc., can all enter the body through the skin which in turn triggers inflammation, itchy skin, and all the factors we relate to eczema. On the flip side, eczema often seems to be triggered by what’s going on inside the body and things like the food we eat, how we digest food and if a leaky gut is present or if there is a liver imbalance, to name a few, have all been known to either trigger eczema initially or further exacerbate it.

Types of Eczema

Before pointing out typical symptoms of eczema, it’s important to define the various types of eczema.

Atopic Dermatitis

This form of dermatitis is also referred to as eczema, atopic eczema, atopic dermatitis, and dermatitis. It is most commonly seen in children and creates both dry and scaly patches on the scalp, forehead, cheeks and face. These patches can also be extremely itchy and can ooze pus in some cases. The term ‘atopic’ is used to describe a group of conditions that include asthma, eczema and hay-fever. The term atopic march refers to children who start with eczema and then as they get older also develop asthma and then hay fever/pollen allergies, but many times with eczema symptoms lessening along the way. Children with atopic dermatitis frequently follow this atopic march or progression into other allergic conditions.

Seborrheic Dermatitis

If you experience dandruff or your child suffers with cradle cap, then you or your child are actually suffering from a mild case of scalp seborrheic dermatitis. However, with a more severe condition, skin becomes sensitive, sore, itchy, flaky and even greasy. It can even cause scaling or crust on the scalp, itching and soreness behind the ears, across the eyebrows and around the nose or chest.

Contact Dermatitis

This type of eczema is caused by contact with something in the environment such as pets, dander, dust mites and more. Contact dermatitis usually affects the hands, arms, face and legs. When exposure to the irritant is ceased, the eczema should clear up eventually and not return.

Nummular Dermatitis/Discoid Eczema

This type of eczema is very distinct in that it causes skin to become itchy, red and swollen in circular patches that look like coins. It looks very similar to ringworm, so it’s always best to get checked by your medical practitioner to verify it is in fact a type of eczema.

Dyshidrotic Eczema

Small blisters filled with clear liquid identify this type of eczema. It usually occurs on the hands or feet, but can occur in other locations. It is extremely itchy and for unknown reasons, is much more common in women then men.

Hand Eczema

Although this type of eczema strictly relates to only one part of the body, the hands, it is so common that it has its own sub-type. Check out our best tips for healing hand eczema.

To learn more about other types of dermatitis, beyond eczema, make sure to check out our blog post: How to Identify The Type of Dermatitis You Have

Will My Child Out Grow Eczema?

If your child has eczema, it can be so incredibly hard to see them suffer and surely you’re consumed by wondering how you can help ease their discomfort, which we hope you’ll learn a bit more about later on in this Educational Eczema Series 101-104. But if you’ve wondered if your child will one day finally outgrow their eczema, then THIS post is definitely worth a read!

For more information on what causes eczema, make sure to check out this post with video from dermatologist Dr. Peter Lio: What Causes Eczema?

Stay tuned for next week’s post, Eczema 102: What Can Trigger Eczema?

______________________________________

References:

(1) Dupilumab improves the molecular signature in skin of patients with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis. Jennifer D. Hamilton PhD. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Volume 134, Issue 6, December 2014, Pages 1293-1300.

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How to Stop Itching due to Dry Skin, Eczema, Psoriasis & Allergies

Another great post from itchylittleworld.com – Natural remedies for eczema to soothe your itchy little world..

Have you ever had skin so itchy, you couldn’t think of anything but scratching it raw? If you suffer from eczema, then you’re probably most familiar with the feeling. However, if you’re not suffering from eczema, there can be several other reasons why your skin may be itchy.

This blog post is dedicated to all things itchy! Learn how to stop itching today. Find out what other skin conditions can be causing itchy skin, as well as which products to avoid. Lastly, we’ll share some natural treatments that will ease your itchy skin and decrease scratching.

Please keep in mind that although these tips and information have worked for several sufferers, I am in no way a medical professional. If you’re experiencing severe symptoms or have a topical infection, it is always best to seek medical advice immediately.

What causes itchy skin?

Dry Skin

Aside from more severe skin conditions, dry skin is usually the main factor that contributes to itching. Although there are many similarities between dry skin and eczema, there are several differences as well.

The biggest factor in determining whether you have eczema or just dry skin is understanding what may cause your itchy skin. Normally, dry skin occurs when the outer layers of skin become damaged due to the sun, exposure to water (especially chlorine) or dry air (especially with heating units in the winter) or ingredients in products that strip the skin of its natural moisture.

With dry skin, skin usually feels tight and stretched, but can be slightly flaky causing the skin to look a little white, gray or ashy.

Eczema

After dry skin, this is the most common cause of itchy skin. With eczema, the itch can be nearly impossible to tolerate due to its intensity and frequency. Usually the skin will also be red and inflamed or thick and scaly or weeping and oozing. Eczema is usually chronic and is caused by stress, sensitivities to food, environmental or seasonal allergies and/or reactions to topical products.

Psoriasis

Psoriasis, although sometimes incorrectly grouped with eczema, is a chronic autoimmune skin condition that is characterized by red, itchy and patches also known as scales. With psoriasis, cells build up rapidly on the surface of the skin.

Allergies

If your skin is constantly itchy and flaring up due to a reaction to a skin care or cleaning product, food or something in your environment, you may have allergies! Allergies can create hives, rashes and intense itching and can even trigger more chronic eczema if exposed to the allergen for long periods of time. When someone reacts to something topically only with the reaction only occurring on the skin, this is called contact dermatitis.

In order to know what might be causing the itch, there are a variety of tests you can do. First, if you think you might be suffering from a food allergy, it’s best to go see a doctor or naturopath that can help you find relief.

If you feel you might already be suffering from a food allergy or sensitivity, check out our post: How to Identify Your Reaction: Allergy vs. Sensitivity vs. Intolerance Defined.

There are also a variety of allergy tests you can carry out. For more information on those, check out our blog post: How to Know Which Food Allergy Test is Best For You? Or you can work with a physician to undergo an elimination diet.

If you happen to be experiencing allergies from the clothing you’re wearing, then you might have textile dermatitis. The best way to know if a certain material or fabric might be affecting you, would be to carry out a clothing elimination test, similar to how you would carry out an elimination diet.

To learn more about which materials can cause the most irritation, as well as how to run a clothing elimination test, check out our post: Your Guide to Textile Dermatitis: Latex Hypersensitivity & Polyester Allergy Explained.

How to stop itching, what products should you avoid?

Whether you are experiencing itchy skin due to dry skin, psoriasis, eczema or allergies, the following products should be avoided:

  • Artificially scented soap: You’d be surprised how certain added artificial fragrances and perfumes can irritate skin and are best avoided. Essential oils are usually ok and certain types can actually help to heal or prevent dry skin.
  • Harsh cleansers: It’s best to avoid any chemical filled body washes or skin cleansers that tend to be more alkaline and not pH balanced like the skin needs. These will strip the skin of its natural moisture and can definitely lead to itchy skin.
  • Alcohol: Avoid using products that contain alcohol or any sort. While some are slightly less drying than others, all forms of alcohol will without a doubt dry out skin. And if the skin is dry enough and has led to cracked skin, products containing alcohol will also irritate and burn the skin.

What products can help itchy skin?

For Dry Skin

If you know you’re experiencing itchy skin because your skin is mostly dry (or cracking), these products will help you lock in your skin’s natural moisture and provide relief:

For Eczema

With eczema, it’s best to look for a product that is made specifically for the eczema symptoms you’re experiencing.

  • Weeping/Oozing Eczema: EczeHerbal #1 Oozing Eczema Treatment: This formula was made to calm weeping, oozing eczema that looks angry and red.
  • Red Eczema: Emily’s Hot Skin Soother: Chinese herbs have been blended with natural oils to create one powerful anti-inflammatory balm to treat red eczema rashes.
  • Dry Eczema: Organic Manuka Skin Soothing Cream: This cream gets a second mention because it’s really great for so many types of skin conditions, especially any sort of dry skin.
  • Thick/Scaly Eczema: EczeHerbal #3 Dry Scaly Treatment: Another blend with Chinese herbs, but this time the formulation was created just for combating thick, scaly skin.

For Psoriasis

If you’ve been diagnosed with psoriasis these products will be a total lifesaver for you:

  • Emily Skin Soother’s Liquid Soap Soother: This soap is perfect for those suffering from psoriasis, as it’s extra moisturizing and free of nasty chemicals. Unlike other soaps available today, it won’t strip or dry skin out.
  • Coconut Aloe Moisturizing Serum: Coconut oil is extremely popular among eczema sufferers, but it can also be beneficial for those suffering from psoriasis. Not only does this serum contain coconut oil, but anti-inflammatory aloe vera helps keep skin cool and wounds healed.

For Allergies

If you have allergy-prone skin, check out these products that are great for those with allergies – of course – just double check the ingredients to ensure none of your known allergies are listed.

  • Organic Calendula Salve: This balm is so simple and pure it only has 4 ingredients: olive oil, calendula, beeswax and vitamin E, making it more tolerable and gentle for those with many allergies.
  • Grass Fed Tallow Balm: Unlike artificial balms, this mixture again uses very simple, nourishing ingredients like beef tallow for moisture and itch relief.

For General Itching

Regardless of whether you may be experiencing dry skin, psoriasis or allergies, these products will help all forms of itching:

  • Little Itchy Skin Rash Treatment: This red rash treatment is perfect for soothing any red rash or itchy spot with minor inflammation. Completely beeswax-free and vegan for allergy-prone skin.
  • EczeHerbal #2: Itchy Skin Rash Treatment: If you’re experiencing dry, red and itchy skin, then this is the product for you. This treatment is filled with natural Chinese herbs that are safe for infants, children, adults and even pets!
  • Organic Aloe Vera Skin Soothing Spray: Cooling aloe and soothing calendula can be gently misted onto itchy skin for fast relief with this spray. It’s great to carry in your bag for itch relief on the go!

Wet Wrapping

Something that works wonders for dry, itchy skin is something you may never have heard about, wet wrapping! It’s a popular form of treatment for eczema and psoriasis, but is very effective for many other skin conditions as well. It’s basically all about soaking with water and moisture and then sealing the moisture in for two hours or more using a damp layer of clothing. Read more about wet wrapping in Our Eczema Trials: Wet Wrap Therapy.

Gloves

If you can’t seem to heal your itchy skin from the above recommended products because you’re constantly scratching, make sure to cover your hands and protect yourself from scratching with mittens and gloves! The itch-scratch cycle is no joke. Your skin may start off smooth and normal looking, but once the itching starts, you can scratch so hard that you cause a wound to open up or you’ll create thick skin which will need treatment and time to heal. When the healing begins, the itching may start again and you’re back to scratching mode all over again. So, give your skin the protection it deserves and wear gloves or mittens when you feel the urge to scratch, but it’s most important overnight. If you’re itchy in the night, you will scratch and won’t even know it until you wake up and find the evidence written all over your damaged skin.

Acupressure

You can try acupressure at home! Yes, it’s that easy! And there are a couple of points that when pressure is applied, can really help to relief itching. Check out Acupressure: A Home Remedy for Itchy Skin. 

More Itchy Relief Tips from a Naturopath

Our resident naturopath, Dr. Amy Duong, is an expert in all things skin related. She has a few tips she always shares with her patients to help them soothe their itchy skin naturally. Check her tips out here.

If you continue to experience itchy skin, make sure to visit your doctor as soon as possible.

How do you stop itching? Let us know in the comments below!

Bio: Laura is a contributor and content developer for It’s An Itchy Little World. She is in no way a medical professional. Her comments, suggestions, and reflections are not intended to replace any medical advice. Always seek the help of a medical professional before undertaking any diet or lifestyle changes. Please see It’s An Itchy Little World’s disclaimer for information about affiliate links and more.

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