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Day 518- Day 548: Month 18 Topical Steroid Withdrawal

(August 2015)

Lots of food flares this month.  I experimented with different foods that are on my list.  Some of them didn’t give me hell until eating them for 2-3 days.  The last day was a reaction to a beef stew I made.  It did me IN.  A lot of the pictures where I am REALLY red are just after a shower.  I take VERY hot showers because it burns the itch away.  Feels amazing and doesn’t scratch the skin.  I’ve heard it’s “not good for your skin” but I don’t care haha

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So itchy and painful… But NOTHING compared to early months.

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The later part of flares are always really really flakey.

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Right after shower

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Skin feels super thick and inflamed



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More of the hot bumpy rash



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MY EAR… Been having trouble with this one…. Falls the eff apart when I flare.

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No matter the flare, I can typicall get cleaned up pretty well…

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The stew DID ME IN.  SOOOOO itchy.  SO annoying.

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Right after shower, but the inflammation from the stew is quite bad.

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Peace Out Eczema

May 26, Ragweed Pollen Could Increase Hayfever In Europe

Scientists are saying that climate change and seed disposal are the main reasons for the increase. Ragweed is found in North America, but it is quickly coming to Europe. The main areas that will be affected are Northern Europe, UK and Northern France. The results of a study show that in the next 35 years the instances of hayfever will increase by up to 4 times in these areas. This is not good news for hayfever sufferers, and will mean that even more people will become sufferers. If you are, or a family member suffers from eczema then this is something to keep an eye on, as you could be in the high risk group likely to develop hayfever due to ragweed in the future.
Eczema Blog

BLUE-EMU Partners with Hornish and Richard Petty Motorsports!

No. 9 BLUE-EMU Ford Side ViewBLUE-EMU Partners with Hornish and Richard Petty Motorsports (RPM) in its hometown

It’s known as the most electrifying night in NASCAR and now Sam Hornish Jr. and the No. 9 Richard Petty Motorsports (RPM) team will make it even more exciting for one local partner. BLUE-EMU, based in Bristol, Tenn., announced today it will serve as the primary sponsor of the RPM team during the night race at the Bristol (Tenn.) Motor Speedway.

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Fast Food Linked To Asthma And Eczema In Kids

AppId is over the quota AppId is over the quota Editor’s Choice
Academic Journal
Main Category: Nutrition / Diet
Also Included In: Eczema / Psoriasis;??Respiratory / Asthma;??Pediatrics / Children’s Health
Article Date: 15 Jan 2013 – 0:00 PDT Current ratings for:
Fast Food Linked To Asthma And Eczema In Kids
4 and a half stars5 stars
Kids who eat fast food three or more times a week are likely to have more severe allergic asthma, rhinitis (hay fever), and eczema.

The finding came from new international research and was published in the journal Thorax.


Similarly, a previous study demonstrated that the benefits of breastfeeding in preventing asthma are cancelled out by eating fast food once or twice a week.


The results of the new study motivated the investigators to believe that a fast food diet may be playing a part in the increase in these conditions. If a causal relationship is found, it could have major importance to public health, considering how popular these fast food places are.


Over 319,000 thirteen to fourteen year olds from 51 countries and over 181,000 six to seven year olds from 31 countries were involved in the study. All of the subjects were enrolled in the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC), the largest of its kind involving over 100 countries and almost 2 million kids.


The teenagers and the parents of the kids were asked questions regarding symptoms of asthma (wheeze), eczema, rhinoconjunctivitis (runny or blocked nose along with itchy, watery eyes), and their diet on a weekly basis.


The severity of the symptoms that occurred over the past year were assessed through the questions, including how frequent they were and whether or not they interfered with daily routines or sleep patterns.http://www.eczemablog.net/


Fast food (282678968)
Regular fast food consumption raises the risk of asthma and eczema in children


They were also asked about their consumption of particular foods that were already associated with protective or damaging influences on health, including: fish meat veggies fruit bread pasta butter margarine rice pulses nuts milk eggs fast food/burgers Eating each of those foods was classified as never, occasionally, once or twice a week, or three or more times a week.

The experts controlled for variables that may have affected the results and found that the only type of food to have the same links across both age groups was fast food.


On analyzing their findings, the researchers proposed that “such consistency adds some weight to the possible causality of the relationship.”


Among all teens, consuming fast food was linked to current and severe symptoms of all 3 conditions, regardless of their gender, levels of affluence, or which country they were from.


Although the pattern among children was less convincing, there was still a link found between a fast food diet and symptoms except for current eczema, and poorer nations, except for present and severe asthma.


According to the authors, this dissimilarity may be due to the fact that kids have fewer choices when it comes to making food choices.


Three or more servings of fast food per week were associated with a 39% elevated risk of severe asthma among teens and a 27% increased chance among younger children, as well as to the severity of rhinitis and eczema, overall.


The experts discovered that fruit was protective in both age groups across all countries for all 3 conditions (current and severe) among kids, and among teens, for current and severe wheeze and rhinitis.


Consuming fruit 3 or more times per week was associated with a reduction in the severity of symptoms of 11% among teens and 14% among kids.


There are reasonable explanations for the results, the team pointed out. For example, high levels of saturated and trans fatty acids are found in fast food which can have an impact on immunity, while beneficial compounds and antioxidants are found in fruit.


The scientists stressed that this study did not demonstrate a cause and effect relationship, however, they said that more research is necessary.


The authors concluded:


“If the associations between fast foods and the symptom prevalence of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema is causal, then the findings have major public health significance owing to the rising consumption of fast foods globally.”

Written by Sarah Glynn
Copyright: Medical News Today
Not to be reproduced without permission of Medical News Today

Visit our nutrition / diet section for the latest news on this subject. Do fast foods cause asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema? Global findings from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) Phase Three
Philippa Ellwood, M Innes Asher, Luis Garcia-Marcos, Hywel Williams, Ulrich Keil, Colin Robertson, Gabriele Nagel, the ISAAC Phase III Study Group
THORAX 14 January 2013 doi:10.1136/thoraxjnl-2012-202285 Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

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Glynn, Sarah. “Fast Food Linked To Asthma And Eczema In Kids.” Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 15 Jan. 2013. Web.
7 Apr. 2013. APA

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View the original article here


Eczema Blog

Eczema Support Group Friday Lunch on Children Skincare

Happy New Year and look forward to this year’s first session on the topic of Skincare for Kids.

22 Jan Friday Eczema talk lunch on skincare for kids

22 Jan Friday Eczema talk lunch on skincare for kids

Skincare for young children is important as they are able to understand skincare, and have to take care of their own skin for those who are schooling. Young children may also resist moisturizing and parents have to teach children how to moisturize and understand its benefits. Children who are in primary school also have to be aware some of the school activities that may trigger their eczema flare-ups and learn the basics of managing their eczema in school.

The speaker for this session is dermatology nurse Sister Wong, who is the Senior Nurse Educator at National Skin Center and trained in Dermatology and STI (Sexually Transmitted Infections) Nursing in UK. She had spent many years in the inpatient nursing care in CDC and currently based in outpatient services in National Skin Centre. She is also in charge of training programmes for the nurses in Dermatology.

Block your Friday lunch, on

22 January 2016 (Friday) – Venue, NSC Room 401, 12.15 noon to 1.15pm

Do note though that this is not a consultation session. For those bringing your child, there will be balloons for sculpturing, puzzles and coloring to occupy your children.

You must RSVP so that we can order lunch and arrange the layout for the seats. If you’re coming, please email mommarcie@gmail.com your name, mobile and email, number of adults & kids coming.

One last thing, the session would be starting on-time and information on my blog is not pre-approved by NSC.

Look forward to your RSVP and meeting you!

Eczema Blues

Oct 24, Ten New Genetic Links Found That May Link To Eczema

It has been reported that ten new genetic links have been discovered that may increase the risk of eczema developing. Amongst the genes found, were some that had an effect on certain roles of the immune system. An over-active immune system can be a cause of cause developing. The first part of the research was done with around 21,000 eczema sufferers and over 90,000 non-sufferers. Another 260,000 people were added to the research so the results could be confirmed. The main result of the study confirms how important the immune system is in the development of eczema. How these new found genes will increase the risk of eczema developing may need more research, and more time.
Eczema Blog

Key to chronic eczema itch may lie in special ion channel

Recently scientists reported the discovery of an “itch molecule” (Nppb)  responsible for conveying the itch signal across the synapse from sensory neurons in the skin to neurons in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord.

The media made a great deal of this study, which laid out a substantial model for how we feel itch.

Something I hadn’t noticed, though, was that the Science study considered only a subset of neurons involved in sensing itch—those that are activated by histamine. These neurons, at the itch-sensing end, have a type of ion channel called “TRPV1” that detects histamine and other substances, or “pruritogens,” that induce itch.

An ion channel is a kind of gate that opens when a key–such as a histamine molecule–binds to it. The open gate lets in sodium or potassium ions. When this happens to ion channels in a neuron, the neuron sends an electrical pulse down its length, transmitting information, such as a sensation of itch.

But there are other triggers for itch besides histamine. “Histamine-independent” itch is particularly important in the chronic itch experienced by eczema patients. (And that’s why antihistamines don’t do us any good.)

Histamine-independent itch is transmitted by neurons that possess TRPA1 ion channels. A new study, published in the Journal of Neuroscience, shows that mice only feel chronic itch if they have neurons expressing TRPA1 channels. Strikingly, the scientists show that knocking out TRPV1 channels (the histamine-dependent kind) does not affect the ability of mice to feel chronic itch.

As a model of chronic itch, the researchers shaved the cheeks of lab mice and exposed the skin to drying chemicals over a period of a few days. The mice scratched their cheeks and developed classic signs of dry, itchy skin–unless their TRPA1 channels had either been genetically deleted or inhibited by a drug,in which cases they hardly scratched at all.

The researchers were also interested in whether the itch-scratch cycle affected the sensation of itch. If you don’t scratch an itch, does it get better or worse? The answer appears to be that if you (or, by proxy, a lab mouse) have an itch on your back that you can only scratch by rubbing it against the wall, it may torment you, but when measured by objective standards, skin that you don’t scratch ends up in better shape.

We can draw two practical conclusions from this work, which was led by Diana Bautista at UC Berkeley: that blocking TRPA1 channels with a drug in cream or ointment form could be a potential solution to the chronic itch of eczema; and that it really does appear that if you can break the itch-scratch cycle, your skin will be better off.

Now, we all know how difficult it is to stop scratching. It’s not as easy as saying that you’ll stop. But this type of research certainly highlights the positive feedback of habit-reversal, which uses psychiatric techniques to reduce habitual scratching. Scratch less…and you’ll feel less itchy.

I do have one question: does the molecule Nppb, reported in the Science paper two weeks ago, transmit chronic itch signals as well as histamine-induced itch? If so, it is still a valuable target for further research into eczema therapies.
End Eczema